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Date: 12 Jan 2009 21:54:49
From: RussGeorgiev@aol.com
Subject: Russ Georgiev--Bowler
I think the year was 1969, but it's liable to be 1976. They had a guy
called Alan Steinburg (poker player) and a friend of CK's aka Richard
Swartz (Crazy Kid). Gardena had closed for a few hours and Steinburg
was shooting his mouth off about how great a bowler he was (beat some
local yokel) recently. At that time, I still was in great bowling
shape and did carry a couple of bowling balls with me in the trunk of
my car. Everyone is drinking and the whole group is pro Alan on
bowling. So off I go, telling him they couldn't raise enough money to
have me bowl Alan, as I could destroy him and wouldn't do so unless
the money was right.

Soon, everyone is emptying out and a few thousand are raised. I make
one rule (didn't really want it, but didn't want to look like Alan was
being hustled). I insisted on 'house balls', as anyone having their
own ball in the car would immediately be considered as being a bowler.
Plus, with house balls, accuracy is far more important and no one has
an edge in case the house has a bias. I get a FISH, I don't let them
escape. Soon we laeve the bar between the Monteray/Rainbow and head
for a 24/7 bowling alley on Crenshaw Ave., a few miles away.

These guys couldn't get enough money bet. A person with his own
drilled ball will average at least 20-30 pins a game better with their
own ball. Now, as we go looking for balls, I come across one with a
finger tip drilling job at max weight of 16 lbs. This is an edge in
itself. It's a three game match with money on each game and total
score. Needless to say, I'm pretty sure I shot over 200 every game and
it was an absolute slaughter and I won like Secretariat won.

Back in those days, I even bowled some pot games (games where everyone
puts money up and highest score wins the money, some times a second
place). The big action back in 1968 was at Encino bowl, where all the
pro's on the tour bowled. Glenn Allison, Sheldon Hippo, Bobby Collatas
and numerous others. Most didn't know me and I was only 21 at the
time.

I used to play the gutter whenever I could and started off trying that
shot. Came with a ton of money and sidebet everyone. Started off with
the gutter shot shooting games of 180 having all the pro's think a
sucker had arrived. I was stubborn, but knew I had to switch to an
inside game. After getting stuck a couple of thousand and not winning
a game, more and more bowlers wanted to side bet for as much as they
could.

I hated shooting the inside line, but hated losing money more. So I
changed balls and moved to an inside shot. Next dozen games I don't
think I shot less than 240 plus. Busted everyone. At least half a
dozen were regulars on the pro tour, Numerous backers came down after
they heard a sucker was down at the alley giving his money away. The
sucker:) walked away with about every dollar in the alley.

I held world records for years back in those days. Won every event at
Robin Hood Lanes in Edmonds, Washington back 1966 bowling against 4 lb
pins. Shot a 10 game block of 2633, or a 263 average. Won the 4 game
singles that night, along with the three game 5 man team event and
three man team event. I also ended up winning the doubles event, the
mixed doubles event and all around. Right out of high school and I won
almost 40K bowling.

One of my last major matches in the Seattle-Tacoma area was against
Earl Anthony (perhaps the best bowler ever). He was being backed, as
earl was a little tight with his money back then. We were shooting an
eight game home and home match. They knew I had a big edge at my home
alley, Lewis and Clark lanes, a 32 lane house where I was the only
person who had a 200 plus average out of the thousands who bowled
there. Plus, it was over 220.

Earl's home house was Pacific Lanes in Tacoma. Earl came out shooting
back to back 250 plus games, with me shooting back to back 200 plus.
He had me stuck 100 pins after two games. This was a lefty house and
earl was a big favorite here. However, I found a great line and now
shot back to back 250 plus, while Earl shot 200 plus. The match as we
headed north was less than 10 pins difference (don't remember who had
it, but everyone knew what was going to happen). We got to Lewis and
Clark and I shot about 800 my first three games with Earl shooting
about 650. No fourth game was bowled. I had won easily.


A bowling TV show was started, with qualifying being done at Lewis and
Clark and the show was set to be bowled at Belle Lanes in Bellevue. It
was a ten game qualifying block, with the two highest qualifying for
the show. After 9 games I was over 300 pins ahead of the second place
guy. Didn't need to even bowl the last game, but did as it was 10
games.

The show was supposed to be a winner defends his title. I destroyed my
oppenents so badly that the matches were usually over after the first
game. Belle was a sister house of Lewis and Clark lanes, plus had a
great gutter shot (line of throwing the ball). I was retired quickly
as an undefeated champion as the rating weren't good with there being
no chance for the others. They had another shootout for the next
spots. My brother took over where I left off. He was a lefty.

These days when I'm out and about, people recognize me for bowling
more than anything else, most wondering what happened to me. Everyone
thought I'd be a star on the Pro Bowling Tour. Back in those days, I'd
roll in 20-30 man fields in pot games, winning at about a 50% clip. I
was very fortunate though. All the alleys that the pot games were
bowled in had a great gutter shot. Giving me this shot, was like
giving me a 20 pin edge.

I won so many handicap tourneys back when bowling was in it's prime,
that they changed the handicap rule in the Northwest. Prior to
changing the rule, the handicap was based on the difference between
your sanctioned bowling average and 200. 200 was the mark, with a
bowler having a 160 average, would get 75% of the difference between a
200 average bowler. Meaning he'd get 30 pins a game from me or others
having 200 averages or higher. I was young and was nicknamed the
twirler, since I threw as big a hook (curve ball) as possible back in
thos days. It would go right down the edge of the alley then hook into
the pocket. In one tournament, I rolled 13 straight strikes from start
to finish:). Foulded on 8 trikes in a row and made a strike doing it,
then struck again for a spare and struck out. Was kidded about how
many strikes it took to roll 300. The next game, I rolled 300.

Back to the handicap. I put scores on the board that even a handicap
bowler couldn't beat unless they scored 70-80 pins per game higher
than their averages. This made turnouts for these events a lot smaller
and all those tourneys had guarantee's. Thus, the average rule was
changed back about 1965-66. I, at 19 was classified 220, while the
three local Pro's, PBA members, Johnny Gunther, Darylee Cox and Earl
Anthony were classified 210. Bowling was huge back in the 1960s and
1970s. In a way, this was bowlings compensation to Wilt Chamberlain
and the three second rule. It also ended my total domination of
handicap tourneys in the Northwest.

On January 6, 1964, I bowled the first 300 at Westpark Lanes in
Bremerton, Washington in a local pro tourney. I won a new Bonneville
Pontiac. I was 17.

Russ Georgiev

www.pokermafia.com
www.pokerunchecked.com
www.russgeorgiev.com





 
Date: 19 Jan 2009 19:17:12
From: Lab Rat
Subject: Re: Russ Georgiev--Bowler
Hey Russ - you might like this. Hell, you probably remember this.
Gotta love that dodo ball.

<RussGeorgiev@aol.com > wrote in message
news:7bf30d3f-f7cd-421d-b6a1-83b6872aced2@r36g2000prf.googlegroups.com...
>I think the year was 1969, but it's liable to be 1976. They had a guy
> called Alan Steinburg (poker player) and a friend of CK's aka Richard
> Swartz (Crazy Kid). Gardena had closed for a few hours and Steinburg
> was shooting his mouth off about how great a bowler he was (beat some
> local yokel) recently. At that time, I still was in great bowling
> shape and did carry a couple of bowling balls with me in the trunk of
> my car. Everyone is drinking and the whole group is pro Alan on
> bowling. So off I go, telling him they couldn't raise enough money to
> have me bowl Alan, as I could destroy him and wouldn't do so unless
> the money was right.
>
> Soon, everyone is emptying out and a few thousand are raised. I make
> one rule (didn't really want it, but didn't want to look like Alan was
> being hustled). I insisted on 'house balls', as anyone having their
> own ball in the car would immediately be considered as being a bowler.
> Plus, with house balls, accuracy is far more important and no one has
> an edge in case the house has a bias. I get a FISH, I don't let them
> escape. Soon we laeve the bar between the Monteray/Rainbow and head
> for a 24/7 bowling alley on Crenshaw Ave., a few miles away.
>
> These guys couldn't get enough money bet. A person with his own
> drilled ball will average at least 20-30 pins a game better with their
> own ball. Now, as we go looking for balls, I come across one with a
> finger tip drilling job at max weight of 16 lbs. This is an edge in
> itself. It's a three game match with money on each game and total
> score. Needless to say, I'm pretty sure I shot over 200 every game and
> it was an absolute slaughter and I won like Secretariat won.
>
> Back in those days, I even bowled some pot games (games where everyone
> puts money up and highest score wins the money, some times a second
> place). The big action back in 1968 was at Encino bowl, where all the
> pro's on the tour bowled. Glenn Allison, Sheldon Hippo, Bobby Collatas
> and numerous others. Most didn't know me and I was only 21 at the
> time.
>
> I used to play the gutter whenever I could and started off trying that
> shot. Came with a ton of money and sidebet everyone. Started off with
> the gutter shot shooting games of 180 having all the pro's think a
> sucker had arrived. I was stubborn, but knew I had to switch to an
> inside game. After getting stuck a couple of thousand and not winning
> a game, more and more bowlers wanted to side bet for as much as they
> could.
>
> I hated shooting the inside line, but hated losing money more. So I
> changed balls and moved to an inside shot. Next dozen games I don't
> think I shot less than 240 plus. Busted everyone. At least half a
> dozen were regulars on the pro tour, Numerous backers came down after
> they heard a sucker was down at the alley giving his money away. The
> sucker:) walked away with about every dollar in the alley.
>
> I held world records for years back in those days. Won every event at
> Robin Hood Lanes in Edmonds, Washington back 1966 bowling against 4 lb
> pins. Shot a 10 game block of 2633, or a 263 average. Won the 4 game
> singles that night, along with the three game 5 man team event and
> three man team event. I also ended up winning the doubles event, the
> mixed doubles event and all around. Right out of high school and I won
> almost 40K bowling.
>
> One of my last major matches in the Seattle-Tacoma area was against
> Earl Anthony (perhaps the best bowler ever). He was being backed, as
> earl was a little tight with his money back then. We were shooting an
> eight game home and home match. They knew I had a big edge at my home
> alley, Lewis and Clark lanes, a 32 lane house where I was the only
> person who had a 200 plus average out of the thousands who bowled
> there. Plus, it was over 220.
>
> Earl's home house was Pacific Lanes in Tacoma. Earl came out shooting
> back to back 250 plus games, with me shooting back to back 200 plus.
> He had me stuck 100 pins after two games. This was a lefty house and
> earl was a big favorite here. However, I found a great line and now
> shot back to back 250 plus, while Earl shot 200 plus. The match as we
> headed north was less than 10 pins difference (don't remember who had
> it, but everyone knew what was going to happen). We got to Lewis and
> Clark and I shot about 800 my first three games with Earl shooting
> about 650. No fourth game was bowled. I had won easily.
>
>
> A bowling TV show was started, with qualifying being done at Lewis and
> Clark and the show was set to be bowled at Belle Lanes in Bellevue. It
> was a ten game qualifying block, with the two highest qualifying for
> the show. After 9 games I was over 300 pins ahead of the second place
> guy. Didn't need to even bowl the last game, but did as it was 10
> games.
>
> The show was supposed to be a winner defends his title. I destroyed my
> oppenents so badly that the matches were usually over after the first
> game. Belle was a sister house of Lewis and Clark lanes, plus had a
> great gutter shot (line of throwing the ball). I was retired quickly
> as an undefeated champion as the rating weren't good with there being
> no chance for the others. They had another shootout for the next
> spots. My brother took over where I left off. He was a lefty.
>
> These days when I'm out and about, people recognize me for bowling
> more than anything else, most wondering what happened to me. Everyone
> thought I'd be a star on the Pro Bowling Tour. Back in those days, I'd
> roll in 20-30 man fields in pot games, winning at about a 50% clip. I
> was very fortunate though. All the alleys that the pot games were
> bowled in had a great gutter shot. Giving me this shot, was like
> giving me a 20 pin edge.
>
> I won so many handicap tourneys back when bowling was in it's prime,
> that they changed the handicap rule in the Northwest. Prior to
> changing the rule, the handicap was based on the difference between
> your sanctioned bowling average and 200. 200 was the mark, with a
> bowler having a 160 average, would get 75% of the difference between a
> 200 average bowler. Meaning he'd get 30 pins a game from me or others
> having 200 averages or higher. I was young and was nicknamed the
> twirler, since I threw as big a hook (curve ball) as possible back in
> thos days. It would go right down the edge of the alley then hook into
> the pocket. In one tournament, I rolled 13 straight strikes from start
> to finish:). Foulded on 8 trikes in a row and made a strike doing it,
> then struck again for a spare and struck out. Was kidded about how
> many strikes it took to roll 300. The next game, I rolled 300.
>
> Back to the handicap. I put scores on the board that even a handicap
> bowler couldn't beat unless they scored 70-80 pins per game higher
> than their averages. This made turnouts for these events a lot smaller
> and all those tourneys had guarantee's. Thus, the average rule was
> changed back about 1965-66. I, at 19 was classified 220, while the
> three local Pro's, PBA members, Johnny Gunther, Darylee Cox and Earl
> Anthony were classified 210. Bowling was huge back in the 1960s and
> 1970s. In a way, this was bowlings compensation to Wilt Chamberlain
> and the three second rule. It also ended my total domination of
> handicap tourneys in the Northwest.
>
> On January 6, 1964, I bowled the first 300 at Westpark Lanes in
> Bremerton, Washington in a local pro tourney. I won a new Bonneville
> Pontiac. I was 17.
>
> Russ Georgiev
>
> www.pokermafia.com
> www.pokerunchecked.com
> www.russgeorgiev.com
>




  
Date: 19 Jan 2009 20:40:52
From: Lab Rat
Subject: Re: Russ Georgiev--Bowler
Oops. The link might help.

http://au.youtube.com/watch?v=OLFfCstnIFE


"Lab Rat" <robbie.buckley@optusnet.moc.au > wrote in message
news:4974450f$0$26314$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au...
> Hey Russ - you might like this. Hell, you probably remember this.
> Gotta love that dodo ball.
>
> <RussGeorgiev@aol.com> wrote in message
> news:7bf30d3f-f7cd-421d-b6a1-83b6872aced2@r36g2000prf.googlegroups.com...
>>I think the year was 1969, but it's liable to be 1976. They had a guy
>> called Alan Steinburg (poker player) and a friend of CK's aka Richard
>> Swartz (Crazy Kid). Gardena had closed for a few hours and Steinburg
>> was shooting his mouth off about how great a bowler he was (beat some
>> local yokel) recently. At that time, I still was in great bowling
>> shape and did carry a couple of bowling balls with me in the trunk of
>> my car. Everyone is drinking and the whole group is pro Alan on
>> bowling. So off I go, telling him they couldn't raise enough money to
>> have me bowl Alan, as I could destroy him and wouldn't do so unless
>> the money was right.
>>
>> Soon, everyone is emptying out and a few thousand are raised. I make
>> one rule (didn't really want it, but didn't want to look like Alan was
>> being hustled). I insisted on 'house balls', as anyone having their
>> own ball in the car would immediately be considered as being a bowler.
>> Plus, with house balls, accuracy is far more important and no one has
>> an edge in case the house has a bias. I get a FISH, I don't let them
>> escape. Soon we laeve the bar between the Monteray/Rainbow and head
>> for a 24/7 bowling alley on Crenshaw Ave., a few miles away.
>>
>> These guys couldn't get enough money bet. A person with his own
>> drilled ball will average at least 20-30 pins a game better with their
>> own ball. Now, as we go looking for balls, I come across one with a
>> finger tip drilling job at max weight of 16 lbs. This is an edge in
>> itself. It's a three game match with money on each game and total
>> score. Needless to say, I'm pretty sure I shot over 200 every game and
>> it was an absolute slaughter and I won like Secretariat won.
>>
>> Back in those days, I even bowled some pot games (games where everyone
>> puts money up and highest score wins the money, some times a second
>> place). The big action back in 1968 was at Encino bowl, where all the
>> pro's on the tour bowled. Glenn Allison, Sheldon Hippo, Bobby Collatas
>> and numerous others. Most didn't know me and I was only 21 at the
>> time.
>>
>> I used to play the gutter whenever I could and started off trying that
>> shot. Came with a ton of money and sidebet everyone. Started off with
>> the gutter shot shooting games of 180 having all the pro's think a
>> sucker had arrived. I was stubborn, but knew I had to switch to an
>> inside game. After getting stuck a couple of thousand and not winning
>> a game, more and more bowlers wanted to side bet for as much as they
>> could.
>>
>> I hated shooting the inside line, but hated losing money more. So I
>> changed balls and moved to an inside shot. Next dozen games I don't
>> think I shot less than 240 plus. Busted everyone. At least half a
>> dozen were regulars on the pro tour, Numerous backers came down after
>> they heard a sucker was down at the alley giving his money away. The
>> sucker:) walked away with about every dollar in the alley.
>>
>> I held world records for years back in those days. Won every event at
>> Robin Hood Lanes in Edmonds, Washington back 1966 bowling against 4 lb
>> pins. Shot a 10 game block of 2633, or a 263 average. Won the 4 game
>> singles that night, along with the three game 5 man team event and
>> three man team event. I also ended up winning the doubles event, the
>> mixed doubles event and all around. Right out of high school and I won
>> almost 40K bowling.
>>
>> One of my last major matches in the Seattle-Tacoma area was against
>> Earl Anthony (perhaps the best bowler ever). He was being backed, as
>> earl was a little tight with his money back then. We were shooting an
>> eight game home and home match. They knew I had a big edge at my home
>> alley, Lewis and Clark lanes, a 32 lane house where I was the only
>> person who had a 200 plus average out of the thousands who bowled
>> there. Plus, it was over 220.
>>
>> Earl's home house was Pacific Lanes in Tacoma. Earl came out shooting
>> back to back 250 plus games, with me shooting back to back 200 plus.
>> He had me stuck 100 pins after two games. This was a lefty house and
>> earl was a big favorite here. However, I found a great line and now
>> shot back to back 250 plus, while Earl shot 200 plus. The match as we
>> headed north was less than 10 pins difference (don't remember who had
>> it, but everyone knew what was going to happen). We got to Lewis and
>> Clark and I shot about 800 my first three games with Earl shooting
>> about 650. No fourth game was bowled. I had won easily.
>>
>>
>> A bowling TV show was started, with qualifying being done at Lewis and
>> Clark and the show was set to be bowled at Belle Lanes in Bellevue. It
>> was a ten game qualifying block, with the two highest qualifying for
>> the show. After 9 games I was over 300 pins ahead of the second place
>> guy. Didn't need to even bowl the last game, but did as it was 10
>> games.
>>
>> The show was supposed to be a winner defends his title. I destroyed my
>> oppenents so badly that the matches were usually over after the first
>> game. Belle was a sister house of Lewis and Clark lanes, plus had a
>> great gutter shot (line of throwing the ball). I was retired quickly
>> as an undefeated champion as the rating weren't good with there being
>> no chance for the others. They had another shootout for the next
>> spots. My brother took over where I left off. He was a lefty.
>>
>> These days when I'm out and about, people recognize me for bowling
>> more than anything else, most wondering what happened to me. Everyone
>> thought I'd be a star on the Pro Bowling Tour. Back in those days, I'd
>> roll in 20-30 man fields in pot games, winning at about a 50% clip. I
>> was very fortunate though. All the alleys that the pot games were
>> bowled in had a great gutter shot. Giving me this shot, was like
>> giving me a 20 pin edge.
>>
>> I won so many handicap tourneys back when bowling was in it's prime,
>> that they changed the handicap rule in the Northwest. Prior to
>> changing the rule, the handicap was based on the difference between
>> your sanctioned bowling average and 200. 200 was the mark, with a
>> bowler having a 160 average, would get 75% of the difference between a
>> 200 average bowler. Meaning he'd get 30 pins a game from me or others
>> having 200 averages or higher. I was young and was nicknamed the
>> twirler, since I threw as big a hook (curve ball) as possible back in
>> thos days. It would go right down the edge of the alley then hook into
>> the pocket. In one tournament, I rolled 13 straight strikes from start
>> to finish:). Foulded on 8 trikes in a row and made a strike doing it,
>> then struck again for a spare and struck out. Was kidded about how
>> many strikes it took to roll 300. The next game, I rolled 300.
>>
>> Back to the handicap. I put scores on the board that even a handicap
>> bowler couldn't beat unless they scored 70-80 pins per game higher
>> than their averages. This made turnouts for these events a lot smaller
>> and all those tourneys had guarantee's. Thus, the average rule was
>> changed back about 1965-66. I, at 19 was classified 220, while the
>> three local Pro's, PBA members, Johnny Gunther, Darylee Cox and Earl
>> Anthony were classified 210. Bowling was huge back in the 1960s and
>> 1970s. In a way, this was bowlings compensation to Wilt Chamberlain
>> and the three second rule. It also ended my total domination of
>> handicap tourneys in the Northwest.
>>
>> On January 6, 1964, I bowled the first 300 at Westpark Lanes in
>> Bremerton, Washington in a local pro tourney. I won a new Bonneville
>> Pontiac. I was 17.
>>
>> Russ Georgiev
>>
>> www.pokermafia.com
>> www.pokerunchecked.com
>> www.russgeorgiev.com
>>
>
>




 
Date: 13 Jan 2009 17:46:51
From: RussGeorgiev@aol.com
Subject: Re: Russ Georgiev--Bowler
I hope when I die I have about $1,000. My cats have an insurance
policy for $250,000. Should I leave the rest to the government? Maybe
Bush needs the money?




On Jan 13, 5:06=EF=BF=BDpm, OrangeSFO <intangible...@yahoo.com > wrote:
> It's not enough to MAKE the money Russ...you have to KEEP the money.



  
Date: 13 Jan 2009 18:02:58
From: Paul Popinjay
Subject: Re: Russ Georgiev--Bowler
<RussGeorgiev@aol.com > wrote in message
news:537eb755-a074-4810-b40b-fd40c4f277be@n21g2000vba.googlegroups.com...
> I hope when I die I have about $1,000. My cats have an insurance
> policy for $250,000. Should I leave the rest to the government? Maybe
> Bush needs the money?


This is so nice of you, Russ, having that insurance policy for the cats. It
truly is nice of you. You are a good person.

best regards,
Paul




 
Date: 13 Jan 2009 17:45:17
From: RussGeorgiev@aol.com
Subject: Re: Russ Georgiev--Bowler
That's why I gave away over 100k on RGP to complete strangers over the
years, including backing about a dozen strangers in the 2005 WSOP. I'm
worried about going broke:).



On Jan 13, 5:06=EF=BF=BDpm, OrangeSFO <intangible...@yahoo.com > wrote:
> It's not enough to MAKE the money Russ...you have to KEEP the money.



  
Date: 14 Jan 2009 21:50:56
From: DaVoice
Subject: Re: Russ Georgiev--Bowler

<RussGeorgiev@aol.com > wrote in message
news:c9a133bb-4a21-450b-b45b-aab59111d880@e25g2000vbe.googlegroups.com...
That's why I gave away over 100k on RGP to complete strangers over the
years, including backing about a dozen strangers in the 2005 WSOP. I'm
worried about going broke:).



On Jan 13, 5:06?pm, OrangeSFO <intangible...@yahoo.com > wrote:
> It's not enough to MAKE the money Russ...you have to KEEP the money.

I can attest that Russ backed me for the $1500 Razz tourney @ the 2005 WSOP.
Sent me a Postal Money Order via Overnight mail (or two day, can't
remember). I seriously doubt he's broke, especially since he has a REAL
publisher doing his book, he probably got a nice advance.

--
Rick "ADB DaVoice" Charles




 
Date: 13 Jan 2009 17:06:27
From: OrangeSFO
Subject: Re: Russ Georgiev--Bowler
It's not enough to MAKE the money Russ...you have to KEEP the money.


  
Date: 19 Jan 2009 16:56:25
From: brewmaster
Subject: Re: Russ Georgiev--Bowler
On Jan 13 2009 5:06 PM, OrangeSFO wrote:

> It's not enough to MAKE the money Russ...you have to KEEP the money.

Huh? You should SPEND the money. The day you die the last check you
wrote should come back "returned for insufficient funds". Then, you lived
a good life.


Brew
--
Email me here: http://tinymail.me/k4r2nk

______________________________________________________________________
RecGroups : the community-oriented newsreader : www.recgroups.com




  
Date: 13 Jan 2009 21:11:53
From: hanks
Subject: Re: Russ Georgiev--Bowler
On Jan 13 2009 5:06 PM, OrangeSFO wrote:

> It's not enough to MAKE the money Russ...you have to KEEP the money.

You've got to keep the money if you're a nit shit, consevative,pussey.
If you're a man you go out and get some more if you get broke
Russ has given away more money than a stiff like you has
ever seen.
hanks

____________________________________________________________________
: the next generation of web-newsreaders : http://www.recgroups.com



   
Date: 13 Jan 2009 21:45:10
From: hanks
Subject: Re: Russ Georgiev--Bowler
On Jan 13 2009 9:11 PM, hanks wrote:

> On Jan 13 2009 5:06 PM, OrangeSFO wrote:
>
> > It's not enough to MAKE the money Russ...you have to KEEP the money.
>
> You've got to keep the money if you're a nit shit, consevative,pussey.
> If you're a man you go out and get some more if you get broke
> Russ has given away more money than a stiff like you has
> ever seen.
> hanks

I'm paying a hotel tab of 700 a day and have for 2 mos. while my house is
being remodled.
My wife's got more ice on her hands than most jewelry stores. My wife and
I drive good cars
eat at Dal Rae have the best health insurance and closets full of of the
best clothes.
I've never had more than 40,000 cash in my life.
While you're busy keeping youir money I'll be stealing yours you fucking
nits are disgusting!!!
hanks

-------
looking for a better newsgroup-reader? - www.recgroups.com




    
Date: 19 Jan 2009 16:57:38
From: brewmaster
Subject: Re: Russ Georgiev--Bowler
On Jan 13 2009 9:45 PM, hanks wrote:

> On Jan 13 2009 9:11 PM, hanks wrote:
>
> > On Jan 13 2009 5:06 PM, OrangeSFO wrote:
> >
> > > It's not enough to MAKE the money Russ...you have to KEEP the money.
> >
> > You've got to keep the money if you're a nit shit, consevative,pussey.
> > If you're a man you go out and get some more if you get broke
> > Russ has given away more money than a stiff like you has
> > ever seen.
> > hanks
>
> I'm paying a hotel tab of 700 a day and have for 2 mos. while my house is
> being remodled.
> My wife's got more ice on her hands than most jewelry stores. My wife and
> I drive good cars
> eat at Dal Rae have the best health insurance and closets full of of the
> best clothes.
> I've never had more than 40,000 cash in my life.
> While you're busy keeping youir money I'll be stealing yours you fucking
> nits are disgusting!!!
> hanks

God I couldn't agree more.


Brew
--
Email me here: http://tinymail.me/k4r2nk

____________________________________________________________________
* kill-files, watch-lists, favorites, and more.. www.recgroups.com



 
Date: 13 Jan 2009 15:42:31
From: RussGeorgiev@aol.com
Subject: Re: Russ Georgiev--Bowler
Most CEO's of company are unknown, yet they make more money than 99%
of the celebrities. I made the money, I didn't need the publicity.
Turned down numerous intweviews long ago for magazines. I have lived
like a king 99% of my life, yet none of you know JACK.



On Jan 13, 2:58=EF=BF=BDpm, OrangeSFO <intangible...@yahoo.com > wrote:
> Another "I could've been somebody" story from Russ.
>
> Makes you believe in karma, don't it?



 
Date: 13 Jan 2009 14:58:29
From: OrangeSFO
Subject: Re: Russ Georgiev--Bowler
Another "I could've been somebody" story from Russ.

Makes you believe in karma, don't it?


 
Date: 13 Jan 2009 11:57:18
From: RussGeorgiev@aol.com
Subject: Re: Russ Georgiev--Bowler
On Jan 13, 11:27=EF=BF=BDam, "John_Brian_K" <a7ec...@webnntp.invalid > wrote=
:
> > The problem with you is the following. I know all this stuff, yet you
> > fail to think I know whom I cheated with or against. When I tell you
> > Chip and Doyle and the Vegas boys were the biggest and best poker
> > cheats in the world you don't or don't want to believe me.
>
> Find a thread where I said Doyle and Chip were not crooked. =EF=BF=BDFind=
it. =EF=BF=BDYou
> cant because I NEVER said that. =EF=BF=BDI just don't care. =EF=BF=BDSo w=
hat they cheated,
> so did you big deal. =EF=BF=BDI am sick of hearing about it. =EF=BF=BDI a=
m no fanboy of
> anyone. =EF=BF=BD
>
> > You're a
> > hypocrite.
>
> No I am not, but you are a jerk and I am sure I could find people to
> second that opinion.
>
> > Doyle had Jack Binion and Benny Benny Binion, Jacks father
> > to look after him in Vegas. Benny Binion was a real time gangster
> > himself. Yet, because you have a one sided media based only on total
> > profit, you care to believe what you like.
>



> I don't give a fuck who cheated who 40 years ago. =EF=BF=BDI do not care.=
=EF=BF=BDGet it?

Who's talking about the cheating 40 years ago? I'm talking about the
cheating today. You think it stopped because Card Player Rag told you?
The cheating is just as much today as before, just more sophisticated.
Every other day a politician is being indicted for something. You
think the world is getting more honest? At least they have bodies that
patrol and monitor the others, yet poker has nothing. They steal 10s
of millions on Absolute-Ultimate and nothing is done. They arrest the
appointed Cheating Poker Czar in NJ, yet nothing is done. And here you
are, thinking I'm talking about 40 years ago.






>
> > If you were a drug dealer selling drugs in a city, you'd surely know
> > who your competition was if you were a big dealer. If you didn't you'd
> > been dead long ago and a fool. It didn't take a genuius to realize
> > Macy's and Gimbels were big rivals in the NYC market. Yet you, in your
> > closed mind think all these so called icons of poker are all fine. If
> > I didn't open my mouth, you'd have never known JACK. If I knew the WPT
> > and online were coming like this, I would have never said JACK.
>
> > How;d you have liked that?
>
> I never said anything about everyone being 'fine' =EF=BF=BDI do not care =
either
> way. =EF=BF=BDHey Russ here is an idea how about you try to be HUMAN. =EF=
=BF=BDHow about
> that buddy? =EF=BF=BDHow about trying to be real? =EF=BF=BDDo what you li=
ke. =EF=BF=BDI here (from
> your own posts every once in awhile) that you are a sick person.
>
> Leave the scamming behind and try to act like a human for once. =EF=BF=BD=
It sounds
> like you do not have much time left. =EF=BF=BDTry to enjoy it for fucks s=
ake.
>
> =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D
> You must not think me necessarily foolish because I am facetious,
> nor will =EF=BF=BDI =EF=BF=BDconsider you =EF=BF=BDnecessarily wise =EF=
=BF=BDbecause you are =EF=BF=BDgrave.
> =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D
> BOOM byae
> John
>
> ---=EF=BF=BD
> * kill-files, watch-lists, favorites, and more..www.recgroups.com



  
Date: 13 Jan 2009 12:10:38
From: John_Brian_K
Subject: Re: Russ Georgiev--Bowler
> Who's talking about the cheating 40 years ago? I'm talking about the
> cheating today. You think it stopped because Card Player Rag told you?
> The cheating is just as much today as before, just more sophisticated.
> Every other day a politician is being indicted for something. You
> think the world is getting more honest? At least they have bodies that
> patrol and monitor the others, yet poker has nothing. They steal 10s
> of millions on Absolute-Ultimate and nothing is done. They arrest the
> appointed Cheating Poker Czar in NJ, yet nothing is done. And here you
> are, thinking I'm talking about 40 years ago.

I play at Greektown Casino in downtown Detroit. I do not care if Mike
'oneyed' Jackson is stealing tip money @ the bike or that Jim 'badass'
foster is raking people at Fulltilt.

========================================
You must not think me necessarily foolish because I am facetious,
nor will I consider you necessarily wise because you are grave.
========
BOOM byae
John

---
* kill-files, watch-lists, favorites, and more.. www.recgroups.com



 
Date: 13 Jan 2009 11:02:33
From: RussGeorgiev@aol.com
Subject: Re: Russ Georgiev--Bowler
The problem with you is the following. I know all this stuff, yet you
fail to think I know whom I cheated with or against. When I tell you
Chip and Doyle and the Vegas boys were the biggest and best poker
cheats in the world you don't or don't want to believe me. You're a
hypocrite. Doyle had Jack Binion and Benny Benny Binion, Jacks father
to look after him in Vegas. Benny Binion was a real time gangster
himself. Yet, because you have a one sided media based only on total
profit, you care to believe what you like.

If you were a drug dealer selling drugs in a city, you'd surely know
who your competition was if you were a big dealer. If you didn't you'd
been dead long ago and a fool. It didn't take a genuius to realize
Macy's and Gimbels were big rivals in the NYC market. Yet you, in your
closed mind think all these so called icons of poker are all fine. If
I didn't open my mouth, you'd have never known JACK. If I knew the WPT
and online were coming like this, I would have never said JACK.

How;d you have liked that?






On Jan 13, 8:58=EF=BF=BDam, "John_Brian_K" <a7ec...@webnntp.invalid > wrote:
> > On January 6, 1964, I bowled the first 300 at Westpark Lanes in
> > Bremerton, Washington in a local pro tourney. I won a new Bonneville
> > Pontiac. I was 17.
>
> You know some of these stories would actually be nice to read through if
> it were not for the "i cheated the fuck out of them' mentality of all of
> them.
>
> If there were some kind of inspirational message behind these posts they
> would be much better. =EF=BF=BDEven just regular stories about what happe=
ned back
> in the day leaving out the 'I cheated the fuck out of everybody'.
>
> I read the first paragraph of the story and was slightly intrigued, but
> then noticed the all to familiar drum roll to the 'I cheated the fuck out
> of everybody' tone and stopped reading.
>
> =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D
> You must not think me necessarily foolish because I am facetious,
> nor will =EF=BF=BDI =EF=BF=BDconsider you =EF=BF=BDnecessarily wise =EF=
=BF=BDbecause you are =EF=BF=BDgrave.
> =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D
> BOOM byae
> John
>
> --------=EF=BF=BD
> : the next generation of web-newsreaders :http://www.recgroups.com



  
Date: 13 Jan 2009 11:27:04
From: John_Brian_K
Subject: Re: Russ Georgiev--Bowler
> The problem with you is the following. I know all this stuff, yet you
> fail to think I know whom I cheated with or against. When I tell you
> Chip and Doyle and the Vegas boys were the biggest and best poker
> cheats in the world you don't or don't want to believe me.

Find a thread where I said Doyle and Chip were not crooked. Find it. You
cant because I NEVER said that. I just don't care. So what they cheated,
so did you big deal. I am sick of hearing about it. I am no fanboy of
anyone.

> You're a
> hypocrite.

No I am not, but you are a jerk and I am sure I could find people to
second that opinion.

> Doyle had Jack Binion and Benny Benny Binion, Jacks father
> to look after him in Vegas. Benny Binion was a real time gangster
> himself. Yet, because you have a one sided media based only on total
> profit, you care to believe what you like.

I don't give a fuck who cheated who 40 years ago. I do not care. Get it?

> If you were a drug dealer selling drugs in a city, you'd surely know
> who your competition was if you were a big dealer. If you didn't you'd
> been dead long ago and a fool. It didn't take a genuius to realize
> Macy's and Gimbels were big rivals in the NYC market. Yet you, in your
> closed mind think all these so called icons of poker are all fine. If
> I didn't open my mouth, you'd have never known JACK. If I knew the WPT
> and online were coming like this, I would have never said JACK.
>
> How;d you have liked that?

I never said anything about everyone being 'fine' I do not care either
way. Hey Russ here is an idea how about you try to be HUMAN. How about
that buddy? How about trying to be real? Do what you like. I here (from
your own posts every once in awhile) that you are a sick person.

Leave the scamming behind and try to act like a human for once. It sounds
like you do not have much time left. Try to enjoy it for fucks sake.

========================================
You must not think me necessarily foolish because I am facetious,
nor will I consider you necessarily wise because you are grave.
========
BOOM byae
John

---
* kill-files, watch-lists, favorites, and more.. www.recgroups.com



 
Date: 13 Jan 2009 10:52:01
From: RussGeorgiev@aol.com
Subject: Re: Russ Georgiev--Bowler
You know, that's almost exactly what the guy at Lil's said. Said he
was like a shell of what he looked like before and looked really bad.
Was wondering why he was playing 20-40 LH at Lil's. When Rod was
young, he was as tight with a dollar as one could be. He'd never bet a
sports event nor anything else. People would say Rod had the first
dollar he made.

A pack of us young guys used to bowl once in a while at a neutral
alley (one where, most of us had a chance of winning). All of us were
aspiring pro bowlers. We'd bowl for $1 or $2 and the big winner would
usually win about $50. We'd started about midnight and bowled til
morning, then go have breakfast. Breakfast at time was about 35 cents
for bacon and eggs and another 15 cents for orange juice. The whole
tab for breakfast for about 8 of us would come to about $4.00, less
than $5.00 with tip. It was never higher.

Everyone who was the big winner usually picked up the breakfast check,
except Rod, who'd state, separate checks please:). Years later Rod
became a sports betting degenerate also.






On Jan 13, 7:07=EF=BF=BDam, "FangBanger" <a29b...@webnntp.invalid > wrote:
> On Jan 13 2009 12:37 AM, RussGeorg...@aol.com wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > Nah, I know you knew Bob Miller very well, plus Rod. Rod and I would
> > bowl against each other head to head for a whole day at times. I was
> > 17 at the time, he was 19. At 20, I basically quit bowling and turned
> > poker pro, while Rod continued to go full time on the Pro Tour, only
> > to turn poker pro afew years later. Rod and I bowled against each
> > other all the time. We'd go through long streaks where the other guy
> > won, as Rod liked the lanes better went the oil dried up and I liked
> > them better when the alleys were freshly oiled. Rod was a much tougher
> > opponent against me bowling than playing poker though. Rod was a great
> > bowler in my opinion. Had a great shot and versatility. At 17-19, we
> > were very closely matched if we bowled in all alleys. Unfortunately
> > for Rod, the alleys favored my style in Seattle. By 19, I believe I
> > had an edge on Rod in bowling, but I basically quit bowling at 20. Not
> > totally, but my basic income started coming from poker.
>
> > When you're 17, =EF=BF=BDolder people don't want to admit a young kid c=
an beat
> > them bowling. By 19, my reputation and other bowling accomplishments
> > ended this notion. But, poker? The stopped bowling against me, but
> > they wouldn't stop playing poker:). I was always good at cards, as the
> > family played cards all the time. Used to play duplicate bridge when I
> > was 12-15 and had at least 100 Master points. Played about 3-4 times a
> > week. But, at 16 I got my drivers license and then the gambling
> > started.
>
> > My junior league bowling team probaly had the highest average of any
> > team in the country when I was 15-16. I was the lowest average with
> > 197, but the team had over a 1000 average for a five player team. I
> > was also the youngest by about 3 years. I was also the best. We almost
> > never won a game, as we had to spot all teams so many pins and they
> > all wanted to beat us as we made a couple of papers and local
> > magazines.
>
> > By the way, Rod was/is up in Seattle recently. Was spotted at Diamond
> > Lil's the other day playing 20-40 LH. He lost, I was told. He had
> > owned the bowling alley up the hill from Diamond Lil's. Haven't seen
> > nor spoked with Rod since we last played poker when Hollywood Park
> > opened. Obviously, we played heads-up. Yes, I beat Rod.
>
> I was in vegas last year and Rod was in the Palace Sation Sports book
> every day . I talked to him 3 times . He is a shell of what he used to be
> =EF=BF=BDStill a decent guy though
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Jan 12, 10:08 pm, "Arlo-Payne" <arlo_pa...@hotmail.com> wrote:
> > > On Jan 12 2009 10:54 PM, RussGeorg...@aol.com wrote:
>
> > > > I think the year was 1969, but it's liable to be 1976. They had a g=
uy
> > > > called Alan Steinburg (poker player) and a friend of CK's aka Richa=
rd
> > > > Swartz (Crazy Kid). Gardena had closed for a few hours and Steinbur=
g
> > > > was shooting his mouth off about how great a bowler he was (beat so=
me
> > > > local yokel) recently. At that time, I still was in great bowling
> > > > shape and did carry a couple of bowling balls with me in the trunk =
of
> > > > my car. Everyone is drinking and the whole group is pro Alan on
> > > > bowling. So off I go, telling him they couldn't raise enough money =
to
> > > > have me bowl Alan, as I could destroy him and wouldn't do so unless
> > > > the money was right.
>
> > > > Soon, everyone is emptying out and a few thousand are raised. I mak=
e
> > > > one rule (didn't really want it, but didn't want to look like Alan =
was
> > > > being hustled). I insisted on 'house balls', as anyone having their
> > > > own ball in the car would immediately be considered as being a bowl=
er.
> > > > Plus, with house balls, accuracy is far more important and no one h=
as
> > > > an edge in case the house has a bias. I get a FISH, I don't let the=
m
> > > > escape. Soon we laeve the bar between the Monteray/Rainbow and head
> > > > for a 24/7 bowling alley on Crenshaw Ave., a few miles away.
>
> > > > These guys couldn't get enough money bet. A person with his own
> > > > drilled ball will average at least 20-30 pins a game better with th=
eir
> > > > own ball. Now, as we go looking for balls, I come across one with a
> > > > finger tip drilling job at max weight of 16 lbs. This is an edge in
> > > > itself. It's a three game match with money on each game and total
> > > > score. Needless to say, I'm pretty sure I shot over 200 every game =
and
> > > > it was an absolute slaughter and I won like Secretariat won.
>
> > > > Back in those days, I even bowled some pot games (games where every=
one
> > > > puts money up and highest score wins the money, some times a second
> > > > place). The big action back in 1968 was at Encino bowl, where all t=
he
> > > > pro's on the tour bowled. Glenn Allison, Sheldon Hippo, Bobby Colla=
tas
> > > > and numerous others. Most didn't know me and I was only 21 at the
> > > > time.
>
> > > > I used to play the gutter whenever I could and started off trying t=
hat
> > > > shot. Came with a ton of money and sidebet everyone. Started off wi=
th
> > > > the gutter shot shooting games of 180 having all the pro's think a
> > > > sucker had arrived. I was stubborn, but knew I had to switch to an
> > > > inside game. After getting stuck a couple of thousand and not winni=
ng
> > > > a game, more and more bowlers wanted to side bet for as much as the=
y
> > > > could.
>
> > > > I hated shooting the inside line, but hated losing money more. So I
> > > > changed balls and moved to an inside shot. Next dozen games I don't
> > > > think I shot less than 240 plus. Busted everyone. At least half a
> > > > dozen were regulars on the pro tour, Numerous backers came down aft=
er
> > > > they heard a sucker was down at the alley giving his money away. Th=
e
> > > > sucker:) walked away with about every dollar in the alley.
>
> > > > I held world records for years back in those days. Won every event =
at
> > > > Robin Hood Lanes in Edmonds, Washington back 1966 bowling against 4=
lb
> > > > pins. Shot a 10 game block of 2633, or a 263 average. Won the 4 gam=
e
> > > > singles that night, along with the three game 5 man team event and
> > > > three man team event. I also ended up winning the doubles event, th=
e
> > > > mixed doubles event and all around. Right out of high school and I =
won
> > > > almost 40K bowling.
>
> > > > One of my last major matches in the Seattle-Tacoma area was against
> > > > Earl Anthony (perhaps the best bowler ever). He was being backed, a=
s
> > > > earl was a little tight with his money back then. We were shooting =
an
> > > > eight game home and home match. They knew I had a big edge at my ho=
me
> > > > alley, Lewis and Clark lanes, a 32 lane house where I was the only
> > > > person who had a 200 plus average out of the thousands who bowled
> > > > there. Plus, it was over 220.
>
> > > > Earl's home house was Pacific Lanes in Tacoma. Earl came out shooti=
ng
> > > > back to back 250 plus games, with me shooting back to back 200 plus=
.
> > > > He had me stuck 100 pins after two games. This was a lefty house an=
d
> > > > earl was a big favorite here. However, I found a great line and now
> > > > shot back to back 250 plus, while Earl shot 200 plus. The match as =
we
> > > > headed north was less than 10 pins difference (don't remember who h=
ad
> > > > it, but everyone knew what was going to happen). We got to Lewis an=
d
> > > > Clark and I shot about 800 my first three games with Earl shooting
> > > > about 650. No fourth game was bowled. I had won easily.
>
> > > > A bowling TV show was started, with qualifying being done at Lewis =
and
> > > > Clark and the show was set to be bowled at Belle Lanes in Bellevue.=
It
> > > > was a ten game qualifying block, with the two highest qualifying fo=
r
> > > > the show. After 9 games I was over 300 pins ahead of the second pla=
ce
> > > > guy. Didn't need to even bowl the last game, but did as it was 10
> > > > games.
>
> > > > The show was supposed to be a winner defends his title. I destroyed=
my
> > > > oppenents so badly that the matches were usually over after the fir=
st
> > > > game. Belle was a sister house of Lewis and Clark lanes, plus had a
> > > > great gutter shot (line of throwing the ball). I was retired quickl=
y
> > > > as an undefeated champion as the rating weren't good with there bei=
ng
> > > > no chance for the others. They had another shootout for the next
> > > > spots. My brother took over where I left off. He was a lefty.
>
> > > > These days when I'm out and about, people recognize me for bowling
> > > > more than anything else, most wondering what happened to me. Everyo=
ne
> > > > thought I'd be a star on the Pro Bowling Tour. Back in those days, =
I'd
> > > > roll in 20-30 man fields in pot games, winning at about a 50% clip.=
I
> > > > was very fortunate though. All the alleys that the pot games were
> > > > bowled in had a great gutter shot. Giving me this shot, was like
> > > > giving me a 20 pin edge.
>
> > > > I won so many handicap tourneys back when bowling was in it's prime=
,
> > > > that they changed the handicap rule in the Northwest. Prior to
> > > > changing the rule, the handicap was based on the difference between
> > > > your sanctioned bowling average and 200. 200 was the mark, with a
> > > > bowler having a 160 average, would get 75% of the difference betwee=
n a
> > > > 200 average bowler. Meaning he'd get 30 pins a game from me or othe=
rs
> > > > having 200 averages or higher. I was young and was nicknamed the
> > > > twirler, since I threw as big a hook (curve ball) as possible back =
in
> > > > thos days. It would go right down the edge of the alley then hook i=
nto
> > > > the pocket. In one tournament, I rolled 13 straight strikes from st=
art
> > > > to finish:). Foulded on 8 trikes in a row and made a strike doing i=
t,
> > > > then struck again for a spare and struck out. Was kidded about how
> > > > many strikes it took to roll 300. The next game, I rolled 300.
>
> > > > Back to the handicap. I put scores on the board that even a handica=
p
> > > > bowler couldn't beat unless they scored 70-80 pins per game higher
> > > > than their averages. This made turnouts for these events a lot smal=
ler
>
> ...
>
> read more =EF=BF=BD- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -



 
Date: 13 Jan 2009 09:48:15
From: bo dark
Subject: Re: Russ Georgiev--Bowler
On Jan 12, 11:54 pm, "RussGeorg...@aol.com" <RussGeorg...@aol.com >
wrote:
> I think the year was 1969, but it's liable to be 1976. They had a guy
> called Alan Steinburg (poker player) and a friend of CK's aka Richard
> Swartz (Crazy Kid). Gardena had closed for a few hours and Steinburg
> was shooting his mouth off about how great a bowler he was (beat some
> local yokel) recently. At that time, I still was in great bowling
> shape and did carry a couple of bowling balls with me in the trunk of
> my car. Everyone is drinking and the whole group is pro Alan on
> bowling. So off I go, telling him they couldn't raise enough money to
> have me bowl Alan, as I could destroy him and wouldn't do so unless
> the money was right.
>
> Soon, everyone is emptying out and a few thousand are raised. I make
> one rule (didn't really want it, but didn't want to look like Alan was
> being hustled). I insisted on 'house balls', as anyone having their
> own ball in the car would immediately be considered as being a bowler.
> Plus, with house balls, accuracy is far more important and no one has
> an edge in case the house has a bias. I get a FISH, I don't let them
> escape. Soon we laeve the bar between the Monteray/Rainbow and head
> for a 24/7 bowling alley on Crenshaw Ave., a few miles away.
>
> These guys couldn't get enough money bet. A person with his own
> drilled ball will average at least 20-30 pins a game better with their
> own ball. Now, as we go looking for balls, I come across one with a
> finger tip drilling job at max weight of 16 lbs. This is an edge in
> itself. It's a three game match with money on each game and total
> score. Needless to say, I'm pretty sure I shot over 200 every game and
> it was an absolute slaughter and I won like Secretariat won.
>
> Back in those days, I even bowled some pot games (games where everyone
> puts money up and highest score wins the money, some times a second
> place). The big action back in 1968 was at Encino bowl, where all the
> pro's on the tour bowled. Glenn Allison, Sheldon Hippo, Bobby Collatas
> and numerous others. Most didn't know me and I was only 21 at the
> time.
>
> I used to play the gutter whenever I could and started off trying that
> shot. Came with a ton of money and sidebet everyone. Started off with
> the gutter shot shooting games of 180 having all the pro's think a
> sucker had arrived. I was stubborn, but knew I had to switch to an
> inside game. After getting stuck a couple of thousand and not winning
> a game, more and more bowlers wanted to side bet for as much as they
> could.
>
> I hated shooting the inside line, but hated losing money more. So I
> changed balls and moved to an inside shot. Next dozen games I don't
> think I shot less than 240 plus. Busted everyone. At least half a
> dozen were regulars on the pro tour, Numerous backers came down after
> they heard a sucker was down at the alley giving his money away. The
> sucker:) walked away with about every dollar in the alley.
>
> I held world records for years back in those days. Won every event at
> Robin Hood Lanes in Edmonds, Washington back 1966 bowling against 4 lb
> pins. Shot a 10 game block of 2633, or a 263 average. Won the 4 game
> singles that night, along with the three game 5 man team event and
> three man team event. I also ended up winning the doubles event, the
> mixed doubles event and all around. Right out of high school and I won
> almost 40K bowling.
>
> One of my last major matches in the Seattle-Tacoma area was against
> Earl Anthony (perhaps the best bowler ever). He was being backed, as
> earl was a little tight with his money back then. We were shooting an
> eight game home and home match. They knew I had a big edge at my home
> alley, Lewis and Clark lanes, a 32 lane house where I was the only
> person who had a 200 plus average out of the thousands who bowled
> there. Plus, it was over 220.
>
> Earl's home house was Pacific Lanes in Tacoma. Earl came out shooting
> back to back 250 plus games, with me shooting back to back 200 plus.
> He had me stuck 100 pins after two games. This was a lefty house and
> earl was a big favorite here. However, I found a great line and now
> shot back to back 250 plus, while Earl shot 200 plus. The match as we
> headed north was less than 10 pins difference (don't remember who had
> it, but everyone knew what was going to happen). We got to Lewis and
> Clark and I shot about 800 my first three games with Earl shooting
> about 650. No fourth game was bowled. I had won easily.
>
> A bowling TV show was started, with qualifying being done at Lewis and
> Clark and the show was set to be bowled at Belle Lanes in Bellevue. It
> was a ten game qualifying block, with the two highest qualifying for
> the show. After 9 games I was over 300 pins ahead of the second place
> guy. Didn't need to even bowl the last game, but did as it was 10
> games.
>
> The show was supposed to be a winner defends his title. I destroyed my
> oppenents so badly that the matches were usually over after the first
> game. Belle was a sister house of Lewis and Clark lanes, plus had a
> great gutter shot (line of throwing the ball). I was retired quickly
> as an undefeated champion as the rating weren't good with there being
> no chance for the others. They had another shootout for the next
> spots. My brother took over where I left off. He was a lefty.
>
> These days when I'm out and about, people recognize me for bowling
> more than anything else, most wondering what happened to me. Everyone
> thought I'd be a star on the Pro Bowling Tour. Back in those days, I'd
> roll in 20-30 man fields in pot games, winning at about a 50% clip. I
> was very fortunate though. All the alleys that the pot games were
> bowled in had a great gutter shot. Giving me this shot, was like
> giving me a 20 pin edge.
>
> I won so many handicap tourneys back when bowling was in it's prime,
> that they changed the handicap rule in the Northwest. Prior to
> changing the rule, the handicap was based on the difference between
> your sanctioned bowling average and 200. 200 was the mark, with a
> bowler having a 160 average, would get 75% of the difference between a
> 200 average bowler. Meaning he'd get 30 pins a game from me or others
> having 200 averages or higher. I was young and was nicknamed the
> twirler, since I threw as big a hook (curve ball) as possible back in
> thos days. It would go right down the edge of the alley then hook into
> the pocket. In one tournament, I rolled 13 straight strikes from start
> to finish:). Foulded on 8 trikes in a row and made a strike doing it,
> then struck again for a spare and struck out. Was kidded about how
> many strikes it took to roll 300. The next game, I rolled 300.
>
> Back to the handicap. I put scores on the board that even a handicap
> bowler couldn't beat unless they scored 70-80 pins per game higher
> than their averages. This made turnouts for these events a lot smaller
> and all those tourneys had guarantee's. Thus, the average rule was
> changed back about 1965-66. I, at 19 was classified 220, while the
> three local Pro's, PBA members, Johnny Gunther, Darylee Cox and Earl
> Anthony were classified 210. Bowling was huge back in the 1960s and
> 1970s. In a way, this was bowlings compensation to Wilt Chamberlain
> and the three second rule. It also ended my total domination of
> handicap tourneys in the Northwest.
>
> On January 6, 1964, I bowled the first 300 at Westpark Lanes in
> Bremerton, Washington in a local pro tourney. I won a new Bonneville
> Pontiac. I was 17.
>
> Russ Georgiev
>
> www.pokermafia.comwww.pokerunchecked.comwww.russgeorgiev.com



Yesterday when I was young

The taste of life was sweet as rain upon my tongue

I teased at life as if it were a foolish game

The way the evening breeze may tease a candle flame

The thousand dreams I dreamed, the splendid things I planned

I always built, alas, on weak and shifting sand

I lived by night and shunned the naked light of day

And only now I see how the years ran away

Yesterday when I was young

So many drinking songs were waiting to be sung

So many wayward pleasures lay in store for me

And so much pain my dazzled eyes refused to see

I ran so fast that time and youth at last ran out

I never stopped to think what life was all about

And every conversation I can now recall

Concerned itself with me, and nothing else at all

Yesterday the moon was blue

And every crazy day brought something new to do

I used my magic age as if it were a wand

And never saw the waste and emptiness beyond

The game of love I played with arrogance and pride

And every flame I lit too quickly, quickly died

The friends I made all seemed somehow to drift away

And only I am left on stage to end the play

There are so many songs in me that won't be sung

I feel the bitter taste of tears upon my tongue

The time has come for me to pay for yesterday when I was young


 
Date: 13 Jan 2009 08:58:47
From: John_Brian_K
Subject: Re: Russ Georgiev--Bowler
> On January 6, 1964, I bowled the first 300 at Westpark Lanes in
> Bremerton, Washington in a local pro tourney. I won a new Bonneville
> Pontiac. I was 17.

You know some of these stories would actually be nice to read through if
it were not for the "i cheated the fuck out of them' mentality of all of
them.

If there were some kind of inspirational message behind these posts they
would be much better. Even just regular stories about what happened back
in the day leaving out the 'I cheated the fuck out of everybody'.

I read the first paragraph of the story and was slightly intrigued, but
then noticed the all to familiar drum roll to the 'I cheated the fuck out
of everybody' tone and stopped reading.

========================================
You must not think me necessarily foolish because I am facetious,
nor will I consider you necessarily wise because you are grave.
========
BOOM byae
John

--------
: the next generation of web-newsreaders : http://www.recgroups.com



 
Date: 12 Jan 2009 22:37:14
From: RussGeorgiev@aol.com
Subject: Re: Russ Georgiev--Bowler
Nah, I know you knew Bob Miller very well, plus Rod. Rod and I would
bowl against each other head to head for a whole day at times. I was
17 at the time, he was 19. At 20, I basically quit bowling and turned
poker pro, while Rod continued to go full time on the Pro Tour, only
to turn poker pro afew years later. Rod and I bowled against each
other all the time. We'd go through long streaks where the other guy
won, as Rod liked the lanes better went the oil dried up and I liked
them better when the alleys were freshly oiled. Rod was a much tougher
opponent against me bowling than playing poker though. Rod was a great
bowler in my opinion. Had a great shot and versatility. At 17-19, we
were very closely matched if we bowled in all alleys. Unfortunately
for Rod, the alleys favored my style in Seattle. By 19, I believe I
had an edge on Rod in bowling, but I basically quit bowling at 20. Not
totally, but my basic income started coming from poker.

When you're 17, older people don't want to admit a young kid can beat
them bowling. By 19, my reputation and other bowling accomplishments
ended this notion. But, poker? The stopped bowling against me, but
they wouldn't stop playing poker:). I was always good at cards, as the
family played cards all the time. Used to play duplicate bridge when I
was 12-15 and had at least 100 Master points. Played about 3-4 times a
week. But, at 16 I got my drivers license and then the gambling
started.

My junior league bowling team probaly had the highest average of any
team in the country when I was 15-16. I was the lowest average with
197, but the team had over a 1000 average for a five player team. I
was also the youngest by about 3 years. I was also the best. We almost
never won a game, as we had to spot all teams so many pins and they
all wanted to beat us as we made a couple of papers and local
magazines.

By the way, Rod was/is up in Seattle recently. Was spotted at Diamond
Lil's the other day playing 20-40 LH. He lost, I was told. He had
owned the bowling alley up the hill from Diamond Lil's. Haven't seen
nor spoked with Rod since we last played poker when Hollywood Park
opened. Obviously, we played heads-up. Yes, I beat Rod.





On Jan 12, 10:08=EF=BF=BDpm, "Arlo-Payne" <arlo_pa...@hotmail.com > wrote:
> On Jan 12 2009 10:54 PM, RussGeorg...@aol.com wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > I think the year was 1969, but it's liable to be 1976. They had a guy
> > called Alan Steinburg (poker player) and a friend of CK's aka Richard
> > Swartz (Crazy Kid). Gardena had closed for a few hours and Steinburg
> > was shooting his mouth off about how great a bowler he was (beat some
> > local yokel) recently. At that time, I still was in great bowling
> > shape and did carry a couple of bowling balls with me in the trunk of
> > my car. Everyone is drinking and the whole group is pro Alan on
> > bowling. So off I go, telling him they couldn't raise enough money to
> > have me bowl Alan, as I could destroy him and wouldn't do so unless
> > the money was right.
>
> > Soon, everyone is emptying out and a few thousand are raised. I make
> > one rule (didn't really want it, but didn't want to look like Alan was
> > being hustled). I insisted on 'house balls', as anyone having their
> > own ball in the car would immediately be considered as being a bowler.
> > Plus, with house balls, accuracy is far more important and no one has
> > an edge in case the house has a bias. I get a FISH, I don't let them
> > escape. Soon we laeve the bar between the Monteray/Rainbow and head
> > for a 24/7 bowling alley on Crenshaw Ave., a few miles away.
>
> > These guys couldn't get enough money bet. A person with his own
> > drilled ball will average at least 20-30 pins a game better with their
> > own ball. Now, as we go looking for balls, I come across one with a
> > finger tip drilling job at max weight of 16 lbs. This is an edge in
> > itself. It's a three game match with money on each game and total
> > score. Needless to say, I'm pretty sure I shot over 200 every game and
> > it was an absolute slaughter and I won like Secretariat won.
>
> > Back in those days, I even bowled some pot games (games where everyone
> > puts money up and highest score wins the money, some times a second
> > place). The big action back in 1968 was at Encino bowl, where all the
> > pro's on the tour bowled. Glenn Allison, Sheldon Hippo, Bobby Collatas
> > and numerous others. Most didn't know me and I was only 21 at the
> > time.
>
> > I used to play the gutter whenever I could and started off trying that
> > shot. Came with a ton of money and sidebet everyone. Started off with
> > the gutter shot shooting games of 180 having all the pro's think a
> > sucker had arrived. I was stubborn, but knew I had to switch to an
> > inside game. After getting stuck a couple of thousand and not winning
> > a game, more and more bowlers wanted to side bet for as much as they
> > could.
>
> > I hated shooting the inside line, but hated losing money more. So I
> > changed balls and moved to an inside shot. Next dozen games I don't
> > think I shot less than 240 plus. Busted everyone. At least half a
> > dozen were regulars on the pro tour, Numerous backers came down after
> > they heard a sucker was down at the alley giving his money away. The
> > sucker:) walked away with about every dollar in the alley.
>
> > I held world records for years back in those days. Won every event at
> > Robin Hood Lanes in Edmonds, Washington back 1966 bowling against 4 lb
> > pins. Shot a 10 game block of 2633, or a 263 average. Won the 4 game
> > singles that night, along with the three game 5 man team event and
> > three man team event. I also ended up winning the doubles event, the
> > mixed doubles event and all around. Right out of high school and I won
> > almost 40K bowling.
>
> > One of my last major matches in the Seattle-Tacoma area was against
> > Earl Anthony (perhaps the best bowler ever). He was being backed, as
> > earl was a little tight with his money back then. We were shooting an
> > eight game home and home match. They knew I had a big edge at my home
> > alley, Lewis and Clark lanes, a 32 lane house where I was the only
> > person who had a 200 plus average out of the thousands who bowled
> > there. Plus, it was over 220.
>
> > Earl's home house was Pacific Lanes in Tacoma. Earl came out shooting
> > back to back 250 plus games, with me shooting back to back 200 plus.
> > He had me stuck 100 pins after two games. This was a lefty house and
> > earl was a big favorite here. However, I found a great line and now
> > shot back to back 250 plus, while Earl shot 200 plus. The match as we
> > headed north was less than 10 pins difference (don't remember who had
> > it, but everyone knew what was going to happen). We got to Lewis and
> > Clark and I shot about 800 my first three games with Earl shooting
> > about 650. No fourth game was bowled. I had won easily.
>
> > A bowling TV show was started, with qualifying being done at Lewis and
> > Clark and the show was set to be bowled at Belle Lanes in Bellevue. It
> > was a ten game qualifying block, with the two highest qualifying for
> > the show. After 9 games I was over 300 pins ahead of the second place
> > guy. Didn't need to even bowl the last game, but did as it was 10
> > games.
>
> > The show was supposed to be a winner defends his title. I destroyed my
> > oppenents so badly that the matches were usually over after the first
> > game. Belle was a sister house of Lewis and Clark lanes, plus had a
> > great gutter shot (line of throwing the ball). I was retired quickly
> > as an undefeated champion as the rating weren't good with there being
> > no chance for the others. They had another shootout for the next
> > spots. My brother took over where I left off. He was a lefty.
>
> > These days when I'm out and about, people recognize me for bowling
> > more than anything else, most wondering what happened to me. Everyone
> > thought I'd be a star on the Pro Bowling Tour. Back in those days, I'd
> > roll in 20-30 man fields in pot games, winning at about a 50% clip. I
> > was very fortunate though. All the alleys that the pot games were
> > bowled in had a great gutter shot. Giving me this shot, was like
> > giving me a 20 pin edge.
>
> > I won so many handicap tourneys back when bowling was in it's prime,
> > that they changed the handicap rule in the Northwest. Prior to
> > changing the rule, the handicap was based on the difference between
> > your sanctioned bowling average and 200. 200 was the mark, with a
> > bowler having a 160 average, would get 75% of the difference between a
> > 200 average bowler. Meaning he'd get 30 pins a game from me or others
> > having 200 averages or higher. I was young and was nicknamed the
> > twirler, since I threw as big a hook (curve ball) as possible back in
> > thos days. It would go right down the edge of the alley then hook into
> > the pocket. In one tournament, I rolled 13 straight strikes from start
> > to finish:). Foulded on 8 trikes in a row and made a strike doing it,
> > then struck again for a spare and struck out. Was kidded about how
> > many strikes it took to roll 300. The next game, I rolled 300.
>
> > Back to the handicap. I put scores on the board that even a handicap
> > bowler couldn't beat unless they scored 70-80 pins per game higher
> > than their averages. This made turnouts for these events a lot smaller
> > and all those tourneys had guarantee's. Thus, the average rule was
> > changed back about 1965-66. I, at 19 was classified 220, while the
> > three local Pro's, PBA members, Johnny Gunther, Darylee Cox and Earl
> > Anthony were classified 210. Bowling was huge back in the 1960s and
> > 1970s. In a way, this was bowlings compensation to Wilt Chamberlain
> > and the three second rule. It also ended my total domination of
> > handicap tourneys in the Northwest.
>
> > On January 6, 1964, I bowled the first 300 at Westpark Lanes in
> > Bremerton, Washington in a local pro tourney. I won a new Bonneville
> > Pontiac. I was 17.
>
> > Russ Georgiev
>
> >www.pokermafia.com
> >www.pokerunchecked.com
> >www.russgeorgiev.com
>
> I know for a fact Russ is a top bowler and could be a pro if he really
> wanted to when he was young.
> He was very tight with Rod Pardee during Rods bowling days.
>
> Note to Russ: =EF=BF=BDVBet it blows your miind I know about your days bo=
wling
> with Rod and that group. LOL
> AP
>
> ____________________________________________________________________=EF=
=BF=BD
> RecGroups : the community-oriented newsreader :www.recgroups.com- Hide qu=
oted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -



  
Date: 13 Jan 2009 07:07:54
From: FangBanger
Subject: Re: Russ Georgiev--Bowler
On Jan 13 2009 12:37 AM, RussGeorgiev@aol.com wrote:

> Nah, I know you knew Bob Miller very well, plus Rod. Rod and I would
> bowl against each other head to head for a whole day at times. I was
> 17 at the time, he was 19. At 20, I basically quit bowling and turned
> poker pro, while Rod continued to go full time on the Pro Tour, only
> to turn poker pro afew years later. Rod and I bowled against each
> other all the time. We'd go through long streaks where the other guy
> won, as Rod liked the lanes better went the oil dried up and I liked
> them better when the alleys were freshly oiled. Rod was a much tougher
> opponent against me bowling than playing poker though. Rod was a great
> bowler in my opinion. Had a great shot and versatility. At 17-19, we
> were very closely matched if we bowled in all alleys. Unfortunately
> for Rod, the alleys favored my style in Seattle. By 19, I believe I
> had an edge on Rod in bowling, but I basically quit bowling at 20. Not
> totally, but my basic income started coming from poker.
>
> When you're 17, older people don't want to admit a young kid can beat
> them bowling. By 19, my reputation and other bowling accomplishments
> ended this notion. But, poker? The stopped bowling against me, but
> they wouldn't stop playing poker:). I was always good at cards, as the
> family played cards all the time. Used to play duplicate bridge when I
> was 12-15 and had at least 100 Master points. Played about 3-4 times a
> week. But, at 16 I got my drivers license and then the gambling
> started.
>
> My junior league bowling team probaly had the highest average of any
> team in the country when I was 15-16. I was the lowest average with
> 197, but the team had over a 1000 average for a five player team. I
> was also the youngest by about 3 years. I was also the best. We almost
> never won a game, as we had to spot all teams so many pins and they
> all wanted to beat us as we made a couple of papers and local
> magazines.
>
> By the way, Rod was/is up in Seattle recently. Was spotted at Diamond
> Lil's the other day playing 20-40 LH. He lost, I was told. He had
> owned the bowling alley up the hill from Diamond Lil's. Haven't seen
> nor spoked with Rod since we last played poker when Hollywood Park
> opened. Obviously, we played heads-up. Yes, I beat Rod.

I was in vegas last year and Rod was in the Palace Sation Sports book
every day . I talked to him 3 times . He is a shell of what he used to be
Still a decent guy though
>
>
>
>
>
> On Jan 12, 10:08�pm, "Arlo-Payne" <arlo_pa...@hotmail.com> wrote:
> > On Jan 12 2009 10:54 PM, RussGeorg...@aol.com wrote:
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > > I think the year was 1969, but it's liable to be 1976. They had a guy
> > > called Alan Steinburg (poker player) and a friend of CK's aka Richard
> > > Swartz (Crazy Kid). Gardena had closed for a few hours and Steinburg
> > > was shooting his mouth off about how great a bowler he was (beat some
> > > local yokel) recently. At that time, I still was in great bowling
> > > shape and did carry a couple of bowling balls with me in the trunk of
> > > my car. Everyone is drinking and the whole group is pro Alan on
> > > bowling. So off I go, telling him they couldn't raise enough money to
> > > have me bowl Alan, as I could destroy him and wouldn't do so unless
> > > the money was right.
> >
> > > Soon, everyone is emptying out and a few thousand are raised. I make
> > > one rule (didn't really want it, but didn't want to look like Alan was
> > > being hustled). I insisted on 'house balls', as anyone having their
> > > own ball in the car would immediately be considered as being a bowler.
> > > Plus, with house balls, accuracy is far more important and no one has
> > > an edge in case the house has a bias. I get a FISH, I don't let them
> > > escape. Soon we laeve the bar between the Monteray/Rainbow and head
> > > for a 24/7 bowling alley on Crenshaw Ave., a few miles away.
> >
> > > These guys couldn't get enough money bet. A person with his own
> > > drilled ball will average at least 20-30 pins a game better with their
> > > own ball. Now, as we go looking for balls, I come across one with a
> > > finger tip drilling job at max weight of 16 lbs. This is an edge in
> > > itself. It's a three game match with money on each game and total
> > > score. Needless to say, I'm pretty sure I shot over 200 every game and
> > > it was an absolute slaughter and I won like Secretariat won.
> >
> > > Back in those days, I even bowled some pot games (games where everyone
> > > puts money up and highest score wins the money, some times a second
> > > place). The big action back in 1968 was at Encino bowl, where all the
> > > pro's on the tour bowled. Glenn Allison, Sheldon Hippo, Bobby Collatas
> > > and numerous others. Most didn't know me and I was only 21 at the
> > > time.
> >
> > > I used to play the gutter whenever I could and started off trying that
> > > shot. Came with a ton of money and sidebet everyone. Started off with
> > > the gutter shot shooting games of 180 having all the pro's think a
> > > sucker had arrived. I was stubborn, but knew I had to switch to an
> > > inside game. After getting stuck a couple of thousand and not winning
> > > a game, more and more bowlers wanted to side bet for as much as they
> > > could.
> >
> > > I hated shooting the inside line, but hated losing money more. So I
> > > changed balls and moved to an inside shot. Next dozen games I don't
> > > think I shot less than 240 plus. Busted everyone. At least half a
> > > dozen were regulars on the pro tour, Numerous backers came down after
> > > they heard a sucker was down at the alley giving his money away. The
> > > sucker:) walked away with about every dollar in the alley.
> >
> > > I held world records for years back in those days. Won every event at
> > > Robin Hood Lanes in Edmonds, Washington back 1966 bowling against 4 lb
> > > pins. Shot a 10 game block of 2633, or a 263 average. Won the 4 game
> > > singles that night, along with the three game 5 man team event and
> > > three man team event. I also ended up winning the doubles event, the
> > > mixed doubles event and all around. Right out of high school and I won
> > > almost 40K bowling.
> >
> > > One of my last major matches in the Seattle-Tacoma area was against
> > > Earl Anthony (perhaps the best bowler ever). He was being backed, as
> > > earl was a little tight with his money back then. We were shooting an
> > > eight game home and home match. They knew I had a big edge at my home
> > > alley, Lewis and Clark lanes, a 32 lane house where I was the only
> > > person who had a 200 plus average out of the thousands who bowled
> > > there. Plus, it was over 220.
> >
> > > Earl's home house was Pacific Lanes in Tacoma. Earl came out shooting
> > > back to back 250 plus games, with me shooting back to back 200 plus.
> > > He had me stuck 100 pins after two games. This was a lefty house and
> > > earl was a big favorite here. However, I found a great line and now
> > > shot back to back 250 plus, while Earl shot 200 plus. The match as we
> > > headed north was less than 10 pins difference (don't remember who had
> > > it, but everyone knew what was going to happen). We got to Lewis and
> > > Clark and I shot about 800 my first three games with Earl shooting
> > > about 650. No fourth game was bowled. I had won easily.
> >
> > > A bowling TV show was started, with qualifying being done at Lewis and
> > > Clark and the show was set to be bowled at Belle Lanes in Bellevue. It
> > > was a ten game qualifying block, with the two highest qualifying for
> > > the show. After 9 games I was over 300 pins ahead of the second place
> > > guy. Didn't need to even bowl the last game, but did as it was 10
> > > games.
> >
> > > The show was supposed to be a winner defends his title. I destroyed my
> > > oppenents so badly that the matches were usually over after the first
> > > game. Belle was a sister house of Lewis and Clark lanes, plus had a
> > > great gutter shot (line of throwing the ball). I was retired quickly
> > > as an undefeated champion as the rating weren't good with there being
> > > no chance for the others. They had another shootout for the next
> > > spots. My brother took over where I left off. He was a lefty.
> >
> > > These days when I'm out and about, people recognize me for bowling
> > > more than anything else, most wondering what happened to me. Everyone
> > > thought I'd be a star on the Pro Bowling Tour. Back in those days, I'd
> > > roll in 20-30 man fields in pot games, winning at about a 50% clip. I
> > > was very fortunate though. All the alleys that the pot games were
> > > bowled in had a great gutter shot. Giving me this shot, was like
> > > giving me a 20 pin edge.
> >
> > > I won so many handicap tourneys back when bowling was in it's prime,
> > > that they changed the handicap rule in the Northwest. Prior to
> > > changing the rule, the handicap was based on the difference between
> > > your sanctioned bowling average and 200. 200 was the mark, with a
> > > bowler having a 160 average, would get 75% of the difference between a
> > > 200 average bowler. Meaning he'd get 30 pins a game from me or others
> > > having 200 averages or higher. I was young and was nicknamed the
> > > twirler, since I threw as big a hook (curve ball) as possible back in
> > > thos days. It would go right down the edge of the alley then hook into
> > > the pocket. In one tournament, I rolled 13 straight strikes from start
> > > to finish:). Foulded on 8 trikes in a row and made a strike doing it,
> > > then struck again for a spare and struck out. Was kidded about how
> > > many strikes it took to roll 300. The next game, I rolled 300.
> >
> > > Back to the handicap. I put scores on the board that even a handicap
> > > bowler couldn't beat unless they scored 70-80 pins per game higher
> > > than their averages. This made turnouts for these events a lot smaller
> > > and all those tourneys had guarantee's. Thus, the average rule was
> > > changed back about 1965-66. I, at 19 was classified 220, while the
> > > three local Pro's, PBA members, Johnny Gunther, Darylee Cox and Earl
> > > Anthony were classified 210. Bowling was huge back in the 1960s and
> > > 1970s. In a way, this was bowlings compensation to Wilt Chamberlain
> > > and the three second rule. It also ended my total domination of
> > > handicap tourneys in the Northwest.
> >
> > > On January 6, 1964, I bowled the first 300 at Westpark Lanes in
> > > Bremerton, Washington in a local pro tourney. I won a new Bonneville
> > > Pontiac. I was 17.
> >
> > > Russ Georgiev
> >
> > >www.pokermafia.com
> > >www.pokerunchecked.com
> > >www.russgeorgiev.com
> >
> > I know for a fact Russ is a top bowler and could be a pro if he really
> > wanted to when he was young.
> > He was very tight with Rod Pardee during Rods bowling days.
> >
> > Note to Russ: �VBet it blows your miind I know about your days bowling
> > with Rod and that group. LOL
> > AP
> >
> > ____________________________________________________________________�
> > RecGroups : the community-oriented newsreader :www.recgroups.com- Hide
quoted text -
> >
> > - Show quoted text -


Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities.
Voltaire

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Date: 12 Jan 2009 22:08:29
From: Arlo-Payne
Subject: Re: Russ Georgiev--Bowler
On Jan 12 2009 10:54 PM, RussGeorgiev@aol.com wrote:

> I think the year was 1969, but it's liable to be 1976. They had a guy
> called Alan Steinburg (poker player) and a friend of CK's aka Richard
> Swartz (Crazy Kid). Gardena had closed for a few hours and Steinburg
> was shooting his mouth off about how great a bowler he was (beat some
> local yokel) recently. At that time, I still was in great bowling
> shape and did carry a couple of bowling balls with me in the trunk of
> my car. Everyone is drinking and the whole group is pro Alan on
> bowling. So off I go, telling him they couldn't raise enough money to
> have me bowl Alan, as I could destroy him and wouldn't do so unless
> the money was right.
>
> Soon, everyone is emptying out and a few thousand are raised. I make
> one rule (didn't really want it, but didn't want to look like Alan was
> being hustled). I insisted on 'house balls', as anyone having their
> own ball in the car would immediately be considered as being a bowler.
> Plus, with house balls, accuracy is far more important and no one has
> an edge in case the house has a bias. I get a FISH, I don't let them
> escape. Soon we laeve the bar between the Monteray/Rainbow and head
> for a 24/7 bowling alley on Crenshaw Ave., a few miles away.
>
> These guys couldn't get enough money bet. A person with his own
> drilled ball will average at least 20-30 pins a game better with their
> own ball. Now, as we go looking for balls, I come across one with a
> finger tip drilling job at max weight of 16 lbs. This is an edge in
> itself. It's a three game match with money on each game and total
> score. Needless to say, I'm pretty sure I shot over 200 every game and
> it was an absolute slaughter and I won like Secretariat won.
>
> Back in those days, I even bowled some pot games (games where everyone
> puts money up and highest score wins the money, some times a second
> place). The big action back in 1968 was at Encino bowl, where all the
> pro's on the tour bowled. Glenn Allison, Sheldon Hippo, Bobby Collatas
> and numerous others. Most didn't know me and I was only 21 at the
> time.
>
> I used to play the gutter whenever I could and started off trying that
> shot. Came with a ton of money and sidebet everyone. Started off with
> the gutter shot shooting games of 180 having all the pro's think a
> sucker had arrived. I was stubborn, but knew I had to switch to an
> inside game. After getting stuck a couple of thousand and not winning
> a game, more and more bowlers wanted to side bet for as much as they
> could.
>
> I hated shooting the inside line, but hated losing money more. So I
> changed balls and moved to an inside shot. Next dozen games I don't
> think I shot less than 240 plus. Busted everyone. At least half a
> dozen were regulars on the pro tour, Numerous backers came down after
> they heard a sucker was down at the alley giving his money away. The
> sucker:) walked away with about every dollar in the alley.
>
> I held world records for years back in those days. Won every event at
> Robin Hood Lanes in Edmonds, Washington back 1966 bowling against 4 lb
> pins. Shot a 10 game block of 2633, or a 263 average. Won the 4 game
> singles that night, along with the three game 5 man team event and
> three man team event. I also ended up winning the doubles event, the
> mixed doubles event and all around. Right out of high school and I won
> almost 40K bowling.
>
> One of my last major matches in the Seattle-Tacoma area was against
> Earl Anthony (perhaps the best bowler ever). He was being backed, as
> earl was a little tight with his money back then. We were shooting an
> eight game home and home match. They knew I had a big edge at my home
> alley, Lewis and Clark lanes, a 32 lane house where I was the only
> person who had a 200 plus average out of the thousands who bowled
> there. Plus, it was over 220.
>
> Earl's home house was Pacific Lanes in Tacoma. Earl came out shooting
> back to back 250 plus games, with me shooting back to back 200 plus.
> He had me stuck 100 pins after two games. This was a lefty house and
> earl was a big favorite here. However, I found a great line and now
> shot back to back 250 plus, while Earl shot 200 plus. The match as we
> headed north was less than 10 pins difference (don't remember who had
> it, but everyone knew what was going to happen). We got to Lewis and
> Clark and I shot about 800 my first three games with Earl shooting
> about 650. No fourth game was bowled. I had won easily.
>
>
> A bowling TV show was started, with qualifying being done at Lewis and
> Clark and the show was set to be bowled at Belle Lanes in Bellevue. It
> was a ten game qualifying block, with the two highest qualifying for
> the show. After 9 games I was over 300 pins ahead of the second place
> guy. Didn't need to even bowl the last game, but did as it was 10
> games.
>
> The show was supposed to be a winner defends his title. I destroyed my
> oppenents so badly that the matches were usually over after the first
> game. Belle was a sister house of Lewis and Clark lanes, plus had a
> great gutter shot (line of throwing the ball). I was retired quickly
> as an undefeated champion as the rating weren't good with there being
> no chance for the others. They had another shootout for the next
> spots. My brother took over where I left off. He was a lefty.
>
> These days when I'm out and about, people recognize me for bowling
> more than anything else, most wondering what happened to me. Everyone
> thought I'd be a star on the Pro Bowling Tour. Back in those days, I'd
> roll in 20-30 man fields in pot games, winning at about a 50% clip. I
> was very fortunate though. All the alleys that the pot games were
> bowled in had a great gutter shot. Giving me this shot, was like
> giving me a 20 pin edge.
>
> I won so many handicap tourneys back when bowling was in it's prime,
> that they changed the handicap rule in the Northwest. Prior to
> changing the rule, the handicap was based on the difference between
> your sanctioned bowling average and 200. 200 was the mark, with a
> bowler having a 160 average, would get 75% of the difference between a
> 200 average bowler. Meaning he'd get 30 pins a game from me or others
> having 200 averages or higher. I was young and was nicknamed the
> twirler, since I threw as big a hook (curve ball) as possible back in
> thos days. It would go right down the edge of the alley then hook into
> the pocket. In one tournament, I rolled 13 straight strikes from start
> to finish:). Foulded on 8 trikes in a row and made a strike doing it,
> then struck again for a spare and struck out. Was kidded about how
> many strikes it took to roll 300. The next game, I rolled 300.
>
> Back to the handicap. I put scores on the board that even a handicap
> bowler couldn't beat unless they scored 70-80 pins per game higher
> than their averages. This made turnouts for these events a lot smaller
> and all those tourneys had guarantee's. Thus, the average rule was
> changed back about 1965-66. I, at 19 was classified 220, while the
> three local Pro's, PBA members, Johnny Gunther, Darylee Cox and Earl
> Anthony were classified 210. Bowling was huge back in the 1960s and
> 1970s. In a way, this was bowlings compensation to Wilt Chamberlain
> and the three second rule. It also ended my total domination of
> handicap tourneys in the Northwest.
>
> On January 6, 1964, I bowled the first 300 at Westpark Lanes in
> Bremerton, Washington in a local pro tourney. I won a new Bonneville
> Pontiac. I was 17.
>
> Russ Georgiev
>
> www.pokermafia.com
> www.pokerunchecked.com
> www.russgeorgiev.com

I know for a fact Russ is a top bowler and could be a pro if he really
wanted to when he was young.
He was very tight with Rod Pardee during Rods bowling days.

Note to Russ: VBet it blows your miind I know about your days bowling
with Rod and that group. LOL
AP

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Date: 12 Jan 2009 22:21:00
From: Paul Popinjay
Subject: Re: Russ Georgiev--Bowler
"Arlo-Payne" <arlo_payne@hotmail.com > wrote in message
news:tnnt36xo6a.ln2@recgroups.com...

>
> I know for a fact Russ is a top bowler and could be a pro if he really
> wanted to when he was young.
> He was very tight with Rod Pardee during Rods bowling days.
>
> Note to Russ: VBet it blows your miind I know about your days bowling
> with Rod and that group. LOL
> AP
>

This was a great post by Russ. It took me awhile to read it, because I'm in
and out of hands on Stars, reading it. Great story, Russ. Keep 'em coming.
All the scooters and have-beens can kiss my ass. And I'm saving this post.
It was a good one!

-Paul