pokerfied.com
Promoting poker discussions.

Main
Date: 28 Jan 2009 00:26:04
From: RussGeorgiev@aol.com
Subject: FAQs----Russ G
Subject: FAQs

Questions:

1 What is a better game for a skilled stud hi lo player: 30-60 with 10
dollar bringin or 40-80 with a 10 dollar ante and bring in?

A=Again, an incomplete question. Russ Georgiev is able to answer even
these. I'm sure when you're speaking about a $30-$60 game with a $10
bringin, you're also talking about a game with a $5.00 ante.

For the better player, the $40-$80 game with an ante of $10 and a
bringin of $10 is far better. The ante ratio goes from 1-6 to 1-4,
even though the bringin goes from 1-3 to 1-4.

The reasons are the following, more money in the pot in the $40-$80
before cards are dealt, forcing tight players to play more marginal
hands. Better players adjust to this type of scenario far easier and
are able to extract more value from the stud hi lo betting

A basic stud hi lo strategy for those playing stud hi lo split is the
following. The tougher games are the ones where the ante ratio is
higher. In these games, stud hi lo betting is very important and the
better players are just better.

2. What is the better structure for the casino?

A=The best structure for a casino is the $30-$60. The reason is proper
stud hi lo betting dictates far more aggressive play in the $40-$80
because of the ante ratio. In this game, stealing blinds is more
effective and done more frequently. The stud hi lo strategy in the $40-
$80 demands more aggressive play and higher fluctuations. Better
players win faster, which is bad from a house perspective. The house
always want the games to last longer.

3. Why do B&M casinos not use the structure like used on the
Cryptologic network: eg 10-20 1 dollar ante and 5 dollar bring in,
or 20-40 with 2 dollar bring in and 10 dollar bring in? The action
was much better there because of this structure when I played.
at this online pokeroomnetwork.

A=While flop games have the same ratio for blinds (usually, exceptions
being $3-$5 and such), stud game variations do not. Most cater to the
cliental of the casino and what they'll go for. The Crytologic sites
advertised 'no robots', but would use props when going in their hey
day. The large bringin ratio was designed to keep short handed games
going, as the rake at Crypto was huge.

At the B&Ms, the smaller level stud games ($10-$20-$20-$40) were full
of weak and tight players, who wanted smaller ante ratios, and
bringins. As there weren't many of these games, as well as the fact
you could only play one at a time (at Crypto, you could play many), it
was in the B&Ms interest to keep the rake going steadily.

4. When and why did the casinos change from stud hi lo to stud eight
or better?
Why not nine/seven or better?

A=Hard question to answer. I may be wrong, but the first qualifier
game I heard was played at the Sahara in Las Vegas around 1980 or so
(could easily be wrong by several years). Prior to that, stud hi lo,
no qualifier was the main way to play this game. Stud hi lo theory for
these two variations of games is totally different.

The Bicycle Casino in Bell Gardens, California had a $20-$40 game in
the early 1990s. My name is Russ Georgiev, I'm writing this article. I
basically put stud 8 on the map. In 1994, I had heart surgery and a
quadruple bypass. I was told not to put much stress on my heart until
I had healed. $20-$40 was a low limit for me to play and I sat down at
the Bicycle one day in this $20-$40 stud 8 game, while waiting for
other stud games.

Before long, I was winner about $1,000. The it dawned on me, either
these regular players were clueless on how to play the game, or I was
clueless. I bet on Russ Georgiev? myself.

Before long, the games were going everywhere in Los Angeles and the
limits were getting higher. I had recuperated and was considered by
most to be the best cash stud 8 player in the world. I didn't just
beat these games, I destroyed them. The limits went higher and higher,
I won more and more, bringing in teams. Soon, if you mentioned stud 8
or better, everyone would mention my name, Russ Georgiev.

The reason they didn't have 7 or better or 9 or better was the math.
Too hard for a seven and to easy for an 9. Made for a great action
game, especially for new players who wanted action and to play lots of
hands.


5 What type of players feel attracted to this game?


Women love this game, as it's exciting to them, allowing them to play
more hands. Tight players are attracted to this game, as so many
totally weak players are in them. While weak aggressive players can
win in Holdem, the same isn't true in seven card stud 8 or better.
When properly played, many pots are capped all the way.

6. Do you have any funny story to tell us about what happened in this
game?

A=There are many funny stories to tell about this game. Most came from
Hollywood park when it open about 1995 with a $60-$120 version of this
game (occasionally going much higher). I started with AAA against a
Chinese guy who ran a poker school. Another guy started with A23,
while the Chinese guy called a capped pot with a 2-7-Q off suit. His
name was Joe Wiley. The pot was capped all the way between three of
us. One guy had low (no high possibility) and I had my AAA. When the
smoke cleared, Joe Wiley had won one of the biggest pots in this game
starting with 2-7-Q offsuit. He made a wheel and a flush and won both
ways.

I had a set of three jackets made for him with 2-7-Q offsuit
embroidered on it. The game was off the charts as far as action, with
players winning and losing in excess of $25,000 everyday. I could give
you 100 stories, but this one is the best.


7. What are banana's in this game? Why call them banana's

I nicked named face cards as banana's in stud eight or better split.
The reason is simple. Many Asians played in the game and in the Asian
culture of gambling, a face card is known as a monkey. So while Asian
player were rooting for monkeys for players, I brought a phrase called
banana into the game. It was like bait for having a player hitting a
monkey or a face card. After I coined the phrase banana, I coined
another phrase called bananarama. This was when you stared with a hand
such as 2345, then caught three face cards. In Los Angeles the phrase
caught on.


8. Is this a good game to play heads up? What would the proper
structure be?

A=It's a great game to play heads-up. The best limit game as far as
I'm concerned. A proper structure for this game heads up could be in
either of two ways. A 1-5 ante to opening bet and a 1-3 bringin.
(example, $75-$150--ante $15, bringin $25) Next example, ($80-$160--
ante $20, bringin $20) ante ratio to opening bet 1-4 and a bringin bet
of 1-4. These are the right structures for players of stud hi lo split
8.



9. Should the rake be taken out of the pot or should there be a time
collection at 20-40?

A=Games of $20-$40 and higher have a high ratio of professional
players, They are the nucleus of the game. Some of the delusional
tight players may think they're better off with a rake, but the exact
opposite is true. Basically the same amount of money is taken out when
the game is FULL. However, when the game gets fewer players, the same
amount comes out also. For the casino, having the same amount come out
of the game whether it's 8 handed or 4 handed is great. For the
players it's a bummer.

I haven't been playing in Los Angeles of Vegas for six year now, but
prior to this, all games of $10-$20 or higher were time games, which
allowed players to play optimum stud hi lo strategy, with professional
stud hi lo betting.

When you have to worry about the rake interfering with your play, your
game is not the top quality it's supposed to be. Good players or bad
players pay the same in time games. In rake games, the good players
get penalized as they are more aggressive.

Does taking rake out of the pot not cause bad games, as the tight
players become even tighter, or do you like it
as the tighter players become too tight.


A=Yes, the games become worse. I believe I answered this question
thoroughly above.



10. Who are Mr. Kim and Mr. Lee?

A=Mr. Kim was a regular player at the Hollywood Park stud hi lo eight
or better game when it started. He played for about a year and lost at
least $2,000,000. He made the game. I was there and got a huge chuck
of the money. In the ring games, I wasn't playing honestly.

Mr. Lee is too small a fish to mention, though he did fill up all
games he played in because he played every hand. The difference
between the two is the following. Mr. Kim played everyday at a much
higher level, while Mr. Lee played a couple of times at a much lower
level. No comparison between the two, though both were great for the
game.

For $20-$40 stud 8 games, about the most live person was Barbara
Enright, a Poker Hall of fame member or soon to be Hall of Fame
member. When she sat down in a $20-$40 stud 8 game, players from $100-
$200 would get on the list.



11. Does Mike Caro know how to play this game?


A=According to Mike Caro, he's an expert in every poker game. I'd like
to have the money he lost playing poker. Back in the 60s and 70s he
was a small winner, but as he started writing, he started losing more.
He was also cheated much of the time.

12 Is Mike Caro an expert in catching people who cheat in this game?

A=Mike Caro is an expert in playing with cheaters. The fact is most
cheaters who play at the level Mike Caro plays are world class
players. In one sense you could say Mike Caro is an expert in catching
cheaters, as honey is to catching bees.








 
Date: 28 Jan 2009 17:52:42
From: RussGeorgiev@aol.com
Subject: Re: FAQs----Russ G
I have a FORUM on www.pokermafia.com that has an ASK RUSS section,
where I answer all questions.





On Jan 28, 12:28=EF=BF=BDpm, "Andyfothershops" <a...@dfr.co.uk > wrote:
> Frequently asked by whom?
>
> Russ Georgiev?
>
> If I asked the questions, =EF=BF=BDI'd make damn sure I knew the answers =
too.
>
> A



 
Date: 28 Jan 2009 20:28:51
From: Andyfothershops
Subject: Re: FAQs----Russ G
Frequently asked by whom?

Russ Georgiev?

If I asked the questions, I'd make damn sure I knew the answers too.

A




 
Date: 28 Jan 2009 00:39:00
From: RussGeorgiev@aol.com
Subject: Re: FAQs----Russ G
On question 6, the other guy started with an 234 suited, not an A23
and made a straight 6.





On Jan 28, 12:26=EF=BF=BDam, "RussGeorg...@aol.com" <RussGeorg...@aol.com >
wrote:
> Subject: FAQs
>
> Questions:
>
> 1 What is a better game for a skilled stud hi lo player: 30-60 with 10
> dollar bringin or 40-80 with a 10 dollar ante and bring in?
>
> A=3DAgain, an incomplete question. Russ Georgiev is able to answer even
> these. I'm sure when you're speaking about a $30-$60 game with a $10
> bringin, you're also talking about a game with a $5.00 ante.
>
> For the better player, the $40-$80 game with an ante of $10 and a
> bringin of $10 is far better. The ante ratio goes from 1-6 to 1-4,
> even though the bringin goes from 1-3 to 1-4.
>
> The reasons are the following, more money in the pot in the $40-$80
> before cards are dealt, forcing tight players to play more marginal
> hands. Better players adjust to this type of scenario far easier and
> are able to extract more value from the stud hi lo betting
>
> A basic stud hi lo strategy for those playing stud hi lo split is the
> following. The tougher games are the ones where the ante ratio is
> higher. In these games, stud hi lo betting is very important and the
> better players are just better.
>
> 2. What is the better structure for the casino?
>
> A=3DThe best structure for a casino is the $30-$60. The reason is proper
> stud hi lo betting dictates far more aggressive play in the $40-$80
> because of the ante ratio. In this game, stealing blinds is more
> effective and done more frequently. The stud hi lo strategy in the $40-
> $80 demands more aggressive play and higher fluctuations. Better
> players win faster, which is bad from a house perspective. The house
> always want the games to last longer.
>
> 3. Why do B&M casinos not use the structure like used on the
> Cryptologic network: eg 10-20 1 dollar ante and 5 dollar bring in,
> =EF=BF=BD =EF=BF=BD or 20-40 with 2 dollar bring in and 10 dollar bring i=
n? The action
> was much better there because of this structure when I played.
> =EF=BF=BD =EF=BF=BD at this online pokeroomnetwork.
>
> A=3DWhile flop games have the same ratio for blinds (usually, exceptions
> being $3-$5 and such), stud game variations do not. Most cater to the
> cliental of the casino and what they'll go for. The Crytologic sites
> advertised 'no robots', but would use props when going in their hey
> day. The large bringin ratio was designed to keep short handed games
> going, as the rake at Crypto was huge.
>
> At the B&Ms, the smaller level stud games ($10-$20-$20-$40) were full
> of weak and tight players, who wanted smaller ante ratios, and
> bringins. As there weren't many of these games, as well as the fact
> you could only play one at a time (at Crypto, you could play many), it
> was in the B&Ms interest to keep the rake going steadily.
>
> 4. When and why did the casinos change from stud hi lo to stud eight
> or better?
> =EF=BF=BD =EF=BF=BD Why not nine/seven or better?
>
> A=3DHard question to answer. I may be wrong, but the first qualifier
> game I heard was played at the Sahara in Las Vegas around 1980 or so
> (could easily be wrong by several years). Prior to that, stud hi lo,
> no qualifier was the main way to play this game. Stud hi lo theory for
> these two variations of games is totally different.
>
> The Bicycle Casino in Bell Gardens, California had a $20-$40 game in
> the early 1990s. My name is Russ Georgiev, I'm writing this article. I
> basically put stud 8 on the map. In 1994, I had heart surgery and a
> quadruple bypass. I was told not to put much stress on my heart until
> I had healed. $20-$40 was a low limit for me to play and I sat down at
> the Bicycle one day in this $20-$40 stud 8 game, while waiting for
> other stud games.
>
> Before long, I was winner about $1,000. The it dawned on me, either
> these regular players were clueless on how to play the game, or I was
> clueless. I bet on Russ Georgiev? myself.
>
> Before long, the games were going everywhere in Los Angeles and the
> limits were getting higher. I had recuperated and was considered by
> most to be the best cash stud 8 player in the world. I didn't just
> beat these games, I destroyed them. The limits went higher and higher,
> I won more and more, bringing in teams. Soon, if you mentioned stud 8
> or better, everyone would mention my name, Russ Georgiev.
>
> The reason they didn't have 7 or better or 9 or better was the math.
> Too hard for a seven and to easy for an 9. Made for a great action
> game, especially for new players who wanted action and to play lots of
> hands.
>
> 5 What type of players feel attracted to this game?
>
> Women love this game, as it's exciting to them, allowing them to play
> more hands. Tight players are attracted to this game, as so many
> totally weak players are in them. While weak aggressive players can
> win in Holdem, the same isn't true in seven card stud 8 or better.
> When properly played, many pots are capped all the way.
>
> 6. Do you have any funny story to tell us about what happened in this
> game?
>
> A=3DThere are many funny stories to tell about this game. Most came from
> Hollywood park when it open about 1995 with a $60-$120 version of this
> game (occasionally going much higher). I started with AAA against a
> Chinese guy who ran a poker school. Another guy started with A23,
> while the Chinese guy called a capped pot with a 2-7-Q off suit. His
> name was Joe Wiley. The pot was capped all the way between three of
> us. One guy had low (no high possibility) and I had my AAA. When the
> smoke cleared, Joe Wiley had won one of the biggest pots in this game
> starting with 2-7-Q offsuit. He made a wheel and a flush and won both
> ways.
>
> I had a set of three jackets made for him with 2-7-Q offsuit
> embroidered on it. The game was off the charts as far as action, with
> players winning and losing in excess of $25,000 everyday. I could give
> you 100 stories, but this one is the best.
>
> 7. What are banana's in this game? Why call them banana's
>
> I nicked named face cards as banana's in stud eight or better split.
> The reason is simple. Many Asians played in the game and in the Asian
> culture of gambling, a face card is known as a monkey. So while Asian
> player were rooting for monkeys for players, I brought a phrase called
> banana into the game. It was like bait for having a player hitting a
> monkey or a face card. After I coined the phrase banana, I coined
> another phrase called bananarama. This was when you stared with a hand
> such as 2345, then caught three face cards. In Los Angeles the phrase
> caught on.
>
> 8. Is this a good game to play heads up? What would the proper
> structure be?
>
> A=3DIt's a great game to play heads-up. The best limit game as far as
> I'm concerned. A proper structure for this game heads up could be in
> either of two ways. A 1-5 ante to opening bet and a 1-3 bringin.
> (example, $75-$150--ante $15, bringin $25) Next example, ($80-$160--
> ante $20, bringin $20) ante ratio to opening bet 1-4 and a bringin bet
> of 1-4. These are the right structures for players of stud hi lo split
> 8.
>
> 9. Should the rake be taken out of the pot or should there be a time
> collection at 20-40?
>
> A=3DGames of $20-$40 and higher have a high ratio of professional
> players, They are the nucleus of the game. Some of the delusional
> tight players may think they're better off with a rake, but the exact
> opposite is true. Basically the same amount of money is taken out when
> the game is FULL. However, when the game gets fewer players, the same
> amount comes out also. For the casino, having the same amount come out
> of the game whether it's 8 handed or 4 handed is great. For the
> players it's a bummer.
>
> I haven't been playing in Los Angeles of Vegas for six year now, but
> prior to this, all games of $10-$20 or higher were time games, which
> allowed players to play optimum stud hi lo strategy, with professional
> stud hi lo betting.
>
> When you have to worry about the rake interfering with your play, your
> game is not the top quality it's supposed to be. Good players or bad
> players pay the same in time games. In rake games, the good players
> get penalized as they are more aggressive.
>
> =EF=BF=BD =EF=BF=BDDoes taking rake out of the pot not cause bad games, a=
s the tight
> players become even tighter, or do you like it
> =EF=BF=BD =EF=BF=BDas the tighter players become too tight.
>
> A=3DYes, the games become worse. I believe I answered this question
> thoroughly above.
>
> 10. Who are Mr. Kim and Mr. Lee?
>
> A=3DMr. Kim was a regular player at the Hollywood Park stud hi lo eight
> or better game when it started. He played for about a year and lost at
> least $2,000,000. He made the game. I was there and got a huge chuck
> of the money. In the ring games, I wasn't playing honestly.
>
> Mr. Lee is too small a fish to mention, though he did fill up all
> games he played in because he played every hand. The difference
> between the two is the following. Mr. Kim played everyday at a much
> higher level, while Mr. Lee played a couple of times at a much lower
> level. No comparison between the two, though both were great for the
> game.
>
> For $20-$40 stud 8 games, about the most live person was Barbara
> Enright, a Poker Hall of fame member or soon to be Hall of Fame
> member. When she sat down in a $20-$40 stud 8 game, players from $100-
> $200 would get on the list.
>
> 11. Does Mike Caro know how to play this game?
>
> A=3DAccording to Mike Caro, he's an expert in every poker game. I'd like
> to have the money he lost playing poker. Back in the 60s and 70s he
> was a small winner, but as he started writing, he started losing more.
> He was also cheated much of the time.
>
> 12 Is Mike Caro an expert in catching people who cheat in this game?
>
> A=3DMike Caro is an expert in playing with cheaters. The fact is most
> cheaters who play at the level Mike Caro plays are world class
> players. In one sense you could say Mike Caro is an expert in catching
> cheaters, as honey is to catching bees.