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Date: 28 Jan 2009 01:09:33
From: RussGeorgiev@aol.com
Subject: Bay 101 Cheats---Russ G
From: Newgca (newgca@aol.com)
Subject: 101 or 1982 GCA
Newsgroups: rec.gambling.poker
View this article only
Date: 2002-08-12 17:17:01 PST
Bay 101, San Jose's biggest card club, was ordered on Tuesday to close
its
tables from 2 to 6 a.m. starting today, putting an end to round-the-
clock
operations after the city won a ruling that bolsters its power to
regulate
gambling.

The decision by retired Superior Court Judge Read Ambler, which upheld
a 1999
ordinance, was a key victory for San Jose as the city tries to rid
itself of
what city officials say are the social ills stemming from gambling,
such as
crime and addiction.

Emboldened by the judge's ruling, San Jose Mayor Ron Gonzales said
Tuesday that
he plans to pursue his long-stated goal of permanently shutting down
Bay 101
and the city's other card club, Garden City Casino.

``I'm very pleased and hope we can move on to the next stage to phase
the
cardrooms out,'' Gonzales said. ``It's important for the safety of our
community.''

Tim Bumb, president of Bay 101, referred questions to club spokesman
Ed
McGovern, who said the club would appeal. McGovern called the city's
concerns
about crime overblown and said the measure could spell financial doom
for Bay
101, cutting revenues by as much as half.

Bay 101 attorneys asked Ambler on Tuesday afternoon to postpone
putting his
ruling into effect, but he refused. City officials and police said
they planned
to be at the club at 2 this morning to ensure it complies with the
decision.
The club's restaurant and deli are allowed to remain open.

Closing the clubs

City Attorney Rick Doyle said he expects to issue a long-awaited
report within
several weeks outlining ways the city could close the clubs. He
declined to
comment on specifics, but other officials say the city could try to
shutter the
cardrooms by declaring them a public nuisance or could condemn the
businesses,
although that would require the city to compensate the owners at a
cost of
untold millions.

Any attempt to close the clubs would likely spark a long and expensive
legal
battle, but Gonzales and other council members seemed braced for such
a fight.

``I think this takes probably the greatest human toll on families of
almost any
other addiction,'' said Pat Dando, a longtime cardroom opponent.

San Jose's 1999 ordinance forced the card clubs, which operate 24
hours a day,
to cease gambling between 2 and 6 a.m. It also banned people who were
not
seated at a gambling table from betting on the hands of people who
were seated.
The regulations were scheduled to take effect on Aug. 31, 2001, but
the
ordinance allowed the clubs to get an extension if they could show the
regulations would cause an undue financial burden.

Both cardrooms appealed for extensions. A ruling on a nearly identical
appeal
filed by Garden City is expected soon.

Bay 101 lawyers presented two arguments to Ambler: The city did not
give the
club enough time to comply, and the law was an unconstitutional
confiscation of
its property because the law would render the business unprofitable.

But Ambler, a retired Santa Clara County Superior Court judge chosen
by city
and Bay 101 attorneys to hear the appeal, was unswayed.

In a 30-page ruling, he wrote that because Bay 101 made no attempt to
comply
with the city's regulations, there was no reason to grant an
extension. And, he
concluded, the club failed to show that the ``two modest
restrictions'' imposed
by San Jose would drive it out of business.

``Taking into account the likely willingness of Bay 101's customers to
make
adjustments to the new rules, Bay 101 should be able to continue to do
business
and to earn a fair return on investment,'' Ambler wrote. He noted that
successful cardrooms in several other states, including Colorado,
Indiana and
Washington, operate under restricted hours.

McGovern said the Bumbs are ``extremely disappointed'' with the
decision, which
he says ignored key evidence. The club also may file a separate
lawsuit
challenging the ordinance's constitutionality, he said.

Richard Teng, San Jose Police Department's gaming control
administrator, said
the four-hour break will force compulsive gamblers to stop chasing
their losses
with bigger bets.

``A mandatory four-hour cooling off will give these people a break to
let them
re-think, re-group -- `Am I doing the right thing?,' '' Teng said.

Breaking a cycle

Police Chief Bill Lansdowne said, ``It's going to return current
gaming in San
Jose back to recreational gaming as opposed to professional gambling.
It will
clearly break the cycle of addictive players.''

The ruling underscored the uneasy relationship City Hall has had with
Bay 101
and Garden City. Under Mayor Susan Hammer's administration, the city
welcomed
the millions in tax revenues the clubs pumped into city coffers
through a tax
on gross receipts. In fiscal 2001, San Jose collected $8.6 million
from the
club.

But as time went on, the relationship soured. After Bay 101 opened in
North San
Jose on Bering Drive in 1994, authorities complained it generated
crime.

``I don't think there is any question they do bring in a degree of
crime to the
city of San Jose,'' Lansdowne said, blaming card-playing for leading
to
assaults, domestic violence and home invasions. ``We have numerous
examples.''

In 2000, Gonzales and other council members called for the closing of
the
city's two cardrooms after a Santa Clara County grand jury handed up
indictments ranging from loan-sharking and extortion to perjury
against more
than 50 Bay 101 workers, including executives Hai Quang Huynh and
Ronald
Werner.

Although 45 of the accused were convicted, none served any serious
prison
sentences. Most of them were sentenced to probation or given a few
months in
jail.

Earlier this year, Huynh reached a deal with prosecutors, agreeing to
pay
$90,000 and promising never to work for any card club in Northern
California.
Huynh had been charged with assault, extortion, tax evasion and
witness
intimidation -- accusations that he denied.

The counts against Werner, perjury and dissuading witnesses, were
dismissed by
Superior Court Judge Kevin Murphy, who said the charges were based on
speculation and not evidence.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------
------
Contact Mike Zapler at mzapler@sjmercury.com or at (408) 275-0140.
*********************************************
All the above was in the newspaper, The Mercury News. Date was July
31,2002 if
I am not mistaken.

And people wonder why 200 employees were laid off at the Bay 101 Club.
It would
seem obvious that many employees, though not accused or convicted, had
much
knowledge of what was going on. Just like Gardena in the 1982.

I have repeatedly stated these casinos keep cheating the customers and
nothing
happens. One of these days, even the morons will realize this. 50
employees
indicted and 45 convicted. How many do you think escaped? Logic would
tell you
many had to escape, or just look the other way and takes hush money,
while not
participating. This is the reason that 200 employees were fired from
Bay 101,
and this is the reason most will not counter with any lawsuits. The
person in
charge was an old Bicycle employee under the old tutelage of James
Wang in the
Asian section of the Bicyle Club. James Wang was also fired or
terminated at
the Bicycle Club, but sued and won his position back. Isn't justice
amazing?
All of this was shown on 60 Minutes years ago, including how the
Bicycle Club
was bought by drug money. The United States government seized control
of the
Bicyle Club for about 10 years. James Wang is the same crook that is
still in
the Bicycle today. I was there, first hand and watched. In fact, when
Haig
Kelligian took over the Bicycle a little while back, he fired Ron
Ying, a
person who was a manager in the Asian section while I was a high
stakes prop at
the Bike. Ron Ying lied on a statement he made for the casino and is
now sueing
the casino [at least he was, the last I heard]. My attorney told me as
he had
seen the documents.

But you people don't have to be worried about cheating anywhere but in
California. Doyle has stated the games are more honest that he has
ever seen
them before. The problem is he didn't state what before was like.
Besides, only
California players cheat, as California doesn't allow any other people
to
cheat, regardless of what state they are in. Ask Doyle Brunson.

Russ Georgiev





 
Date: 28 Jan 2009 19:48:10
From: pixelfreak
Subject: Re: Bay 101 Cheats---Russ G
On 2009-01-28 01:09:33 -0800, "RussGeorgiev@aol.com"
<RussGeorgiev@aol.com > said:

> From: Newgca (newgca@aol.com)
> Subject: 101 or 1982 GCA
> Newsgroups: rec.gambling.poker
> View this article only
> Date: 2002-08-12 17:17:01 PST
> Bay 101, San Jose's biggest card club, was ordered on Tuesday to close

Look Russ. This is from 2002. I've played at Bay 101 plenty of times
and it can be a good time. What's your beef? It is, after all, just a
card game. I presume someone is cheating all the time. I'm sure you've
sat at a live cash game in some obscure cardroom and you just 'felt'
that everyone at the table knows everyone else's niece's nephew's and
cousin's. Further, they all have side bets on you.

Get over it.

--

thepixelfreak



 
Date: 28 Jan 2009 08:33:48
From: QN
Subject: Re: Bay 101 Cheats---Russ G
When the focus is on banning something for religious reasons, the need for
regulation to control cheating may not be addressed.

I have seen both clubs. They are far from the crime areas of San Jose.
(However, Bay 101 smells like an old bowling alley.) The high crime area of
San Jose has always been around the Eastside area of Story and White, but
nearby businesses don't get shut down.